Taiwan destroys chemical-tainted drinks

Jun 11, 2011

(AP) -- Taiwan's leader has overseen the destruction of 2.3 tons of beverages believed to be tainted with a dangerous chemical.

President Ma Ying-jeou called on makers to improve after the products were dumped into a waste treatment plant Saturday.

Authorities have inspected 16,000 stores over the past month and removed drinks, teas and containing DEHP, a plasticizer added to improve color and texture. Officials say large doses of DEHP could cause future reproductive problems for boys.

There have been no confirmed reports of ill effects from the foods. But China and a dozen other countries have banned a long list of Taiwanese products feared contaminated.

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