Stretched-out low soaking the Caribbean in GOES-13 satellite imagery

Jun 09, 2011
This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite taken at 1740 UTC (1:40 p.m. EDT) shows the large, elongated area of low pressure over eastern Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters

GOES-13 satellite imagery on June 9 shows that the pesky low pressure area in the north Caribbean Sea is stretching out and bringing soaking rains to Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica and Puerto Rico.

The called GOES-13 captured an image of this low on June 9 at 1740 UTC (1:40 p.m. EDT) System 94L, and the cloud cover appears centered over eastern Cuba and Jamaica while the outer portion of the low stretches over Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and now south Florida. The elongated low has a minimum central pressure of 1001 millibars and is centered near 20 North and 83 West.

During the afternoon of June 9, Flash Flood warnings were in effect in Puerto Rico for the municipalities of Guaynabo, Carolina and San Juan until 4 p.m. AST. According to the National Weather Service website, "at 1:54 p.m. AST doppler radar indicated that heavy rain continues over the warned area and the Piedras River has overflowed its banks and will flood a number of streets." An Urban and Small Stream Flood Advisory is also in effect for many municipalities.

The forecast calls for showers and thunderstorms across western and northwestern Puerto Rico over the next few days. These showers will bring heavy rainfall and local flooding is possible. In addition to Puerto Rico, the rainfall is also now affecting the U.S/U.K. Virgin Islands and Leeward Islands north of 16 North and east of 67 West.

The GOES series of satellites are operated by NOAA, and the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created the image of today's low pressure area. The NASA GOES Project also creates animations of GOES and that can be found at: http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

System 94L continues to produce disorganized showers and thunderstorms that are bringing heavy rainfall to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Cuba. The low is expected to slowly move northeast.

Explore further: How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

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