Solar panels released in an array of colors

Jun 07, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Solar panels are, for the most part, large black panels, made of squares, but what if it does not have to be that way. What if users could get all of the benefits of solar panels without making their roofs look like the side of a Manhattan skyscraper?

One Canadian-based company is looking to change that view. Qsolar has announced the creation of the Kristal and Kristal Rainbow range of semi-transparent and colored semi-transparent solar panels. These lines come in a variety of colors, including red, green, brown and blue as well as in a few different patterns. The panels do not have frames attached to them, because the panels are rigid.

At first, this may seem like it is simply a vanity, putting a new skin on a , but these semi-transparent have a chance to go places that standard are simply not used, making them an option for buildings that do not have the space to support a standard solar panel set up. Some potential places these new panels could be installed include windows and the glass spaces of atrium roofs. This makes them optimal for building with limited roof space, due to either building design issues or the fact that other equipment has previously been placed on the roof.

The panels are already available for purchase by the public. Information on pricing is on a case-by-case basis, and interested consumers should contact the company to find out what the system would cost to be installed in their building.

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Skultch
5 / 5 (3) Jun 07, 2011
This great. I wish it was unnecessary, but it's still great.

If it made fiscal sense, I would have the south side of my roof covered with the normal panels. I'm waiting on a more permanent residence that hopefully follows a breakthrough in panel efficiency.

That said, I don't get why normal panels drop a properties marketability or even value. Are most humans THAT shallow and unsure of themselves that the look of their roof is an insurmountable social hurdle? Sad.
Skeptic_Heretic
5 / 5 (2) Jun 07, 2011

That said, I don't get why normal panels drop a properties marketability or even value.
I'd like to know where this happens. Everywhere I've seen a professional solar installation the value of the home has gone up, not down.
Skultch
not rated yet Jun 07, 2011
I'd like to know where this happens.


Same here. I don't pay attention to values at the moment, but I keep hearing this is why /not/ to install normal panels. Maybe it's only in upscale neighborhoods where energy security is of no concern and social status trumps everything else. I've hear that most home sales are in the low value range these days. Is there recent data to show sales with/without PVs?
Eikka
3 / 5 (2) Jun 07, 2011
Maybe it's only in upscale neighborhoods where energy security is of no concern and social status trumps everything else.


That would be rather incredible, since only upscale neighborhoods have the sort of people who can afford solar panels.

Same thing as with electric cars. Only about 5-10% of people can really afford to be green without making serious compromizes in their quality of life.
Skultch
not rated yet Jun 07, 2011
Yeah, I don't get it. Where is the info coming from? I don't like being the conspiracy theorist, but could the de-valuing just be a myth spread by the fossil fuel industry in order to protect their investment in exploration?
Eikka
3 / 5 (2) Jun 07, 2011
Yeah, I don't get it. Where is the info coming from? I don't like being the conspiracy theorist, but could the de-valuing just be a myth spread by the fossil fuel industry in order to protect their investment in exploration?


Well, I can totally understand how an ill-designed solar array can piss off your neighbors and be a general eyesore.
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet Jun 07, 2011
Well, I can totally understand how an ill-designed solar array can piss off your neighbors and be a general eyesore.
Like those ridiculous tin roofing materials to prevent ice damming.
Skultch
5 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2011
Well, I can totally understand how an ill-designed solar array can piss off your neighbors and be a general eyesore.
Like those ridiculous tin roofing materials to prevent ice damming.


Exactly. That stuff is everywhere around me. People here still vote down public PV installs.

I actually have to install new heat tape on the north side of my roof this summer. It ain't cheap, but neither is my deductible.

Yeah, I understand that people see it as an eye sore. Don't they instantly know why it's there and shrug it off? No, they don't, because they are hopelessly shallow and selfish people, whomever they are.
Shootist
1 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2011
What if users could get all of the benefits of solar panels


Benefits?

No power when the sun doesn't shine.
No power after a hailstorm
1/2 power, or less, when it rains.
Installation costs will never be recouped even at a $1 k/h.

Too brittle, and too expensive, to power a first world economy. The only political leaders who would foist this crap off on their population are either idiots or have a wish for the nation to fail.

Cheap energy = economic freedom and liberty.
Expensive energy = slavery

Electricity needs to be too cheap to meter.