Small sun-watcher Proba-2 offers detailed view of massive solar eruption

Jun 10, 2011
Small sun-watcher proba-2 offers detailed view of massive solar eruption
7 June 2011 M2.5-class solar flare observed by Proba-2's SWAP instrument. This image has been warped to show the event as it might appear to an observer flying just above the surface of the sun. A massive prominence eruption took place, as a mass of high-energy particles and superheated gas rose up from the Sun’s surface. This gas was relatively cool - about 80 000 K - which explains why it appears quite dark at the extreme ultraviolet wavelength that SWAP observes in.

(PhysOrg.com) -- ESA’s Proba-2 small Sun-watcher was among the flotilla of satellites on watch as the Sun erupted spectacularly this week.

After years of relative quietness, the is waking up. Tuesday 7 June saw a medium-class M2.5 solar flare, associated with a proton storm, a coronal mass ejection that glanced past Earth on Thursday 9 June and an accompanying burst of radio energy.

ESA’s Proba-2 satellite was launched in November 2009, during the most inactive period of the solar cycle, but now the Sun is growing more active as it progresses towards ‘solar max’, expected in 2013.

Small sun-watcher proba-2 offers detailed view of massive solar eruption
Proba-2’s LYRA (Large Yield Radiometer) instrument measures the energy intensity of the Sun across four separate ultraviolet bands every 50 milliseconds, observing a spike in signal across its two short-wavelength bands due to the 7 June 2011 solar flare. The flare caused a decrease in the SWAP average intensity from Proba-2's other Sun-watching instrument, shown in here purple. Credits: ROB

Less than a cubic metre in volume, Proba-2 is the smallest member of the class of Sun-monitoring satellites that includes the ESA/NASA SOHO, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and STEREO and Japan's Hinode.

Proba-2’s radiometer measures the energy intensity of the Sun across four separate ultraviolet bands every 50 milliseconds, and observed a spike across its two short-wavelength bands due to the flare.

At the same time, the satellite’s SWAP Sun-imager captured the massive prominence eruption as it occurred, as a mass of high-energy particles and superheated gas rose up from the solar surface.
 

The 7 June 2011 solar prominence as seen by Proba-2's SWAP. Credits: ROB

This gas was relatively cool – about 80 000ºC – which explains why it appears quite dark at the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of SWAP.

Much of this gas then fell back to the Sun, with dark downflows that brighten as they fall, probably due to localised heating. This darkening actually caused a decrease in the average intensity seen by SWAP.

is a technology demonstration satellite that also houses a quartet of science instruments. The imager and radiometer are operated by the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Two instruments operated by the Czech Astronomical Institute monitor the plasma environment around the satellite, including assessing how the coronal mass ejection affects Earth’s electrically charged ionosphere.

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waremi
not rated yet Jun 10, 2011
Whenever I run across an ESA program I realize what a great job NASA does with it's program websites. I'm sure Proba-2 has more images and/or video of this spectacular event, but for the life of me I can't find any.
omatumr
1 / 5 (6) Jun 10, 2011
Thanks for the story.

Despite the claims of Al Gore, the UN's IPCC, and world leaders, Earth's heat source sometimes becomes violently unstable over the solar globe [1].

Core violence may increase when the normal cycle of sunspots ceases [2].

1. Neutron repulsion rocks the entire Sun [NASA, 13 Dec 2010].

http://science1.n...at-nasa/ 2010/13dec_globaleruption/

2. Neutron repulsion explained [APEIRON Journal, in press, 2011].

http://arxiv.org/...2.1499v1

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Silverhill
5 / 5 (3) Jun 10, 2011
How is it that Sol is supposed to contain a neutron star when its mass is well below the Chandrashekar limit?
omatumr
1 / 5 (5) Jun 10, 2011
1. Neutron repulsion rocks the entire Sun [NASA, 13 Dec 2010].


//science1.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/13dec_globaleruption/

Silverhill
5 / 5 (3) Jun 10, 2011
Repeating an irrelevant link does not answer the question, sir. What about the mass limit?
Silverhill
5 / 5 (3) Jun 10, 2011
The headline at your link has nothing to do with neutron repulsion; it says instead, "Global Eruption Rocks the Sun", referring to a vast system of *magnetic* eruptions.
omatumr
1 / 5 (5) Jun 10, 2011
On August 1, 2010, an entire hemisphere of the sun erupted. Filaments of magnetism snapped and exploded, shock waves raced across the stellar surface, billion-ton clouds of hot gas billowed into space. Astronomers knew they had witnessed something big.

It was so big, it may have shattered old ideas about solar activity.


"The August 1st event really opened our eyes," says Karel Schrijver of Lockheed Martin's Solar and Astrophysics Lab in Palo Alto, CA. "We see that solar storms can be global events, playing out on scales we scarcely imagined before."

"We're still sorting out cause and effect," says Schrijver. "Was the event one big chain reaction, in which one eruption triggered another--bang, bang, bang--in sequence? Or did everything go off together as a consequence of some greater change in the sun's global magnetic field?"

Neutron repulsion in the solar core ["Earth's Heat Source - The Sun", Energy and Environment 20, 131-144 (2009)]?

http://arxiv.org/pdf/0905.0704
omatumr
1 / 5 (5) Jun 11, 2011
Repeating an irrelevant link does not answer the question, sir. What about the mass limit?


Neutron repulsion induces:

a.) Fission, and/or
b.) Neutron emission

That is why there is no minimum mass.
barakn
3 / 5 (6) Jun 11, 2011
Oliver has reached a new low (in terms of his online posts, not his personal life). He has provided what looks like a reference to a NASA document but has replaced its title with his own wording to make it appear as if NASA agrees with his crazy theory. I urge everyone to report the two posts it appears in as abuse.
yyz
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 11, 2011
"Oliver has reached a new low (in terms of his online posts, not his personal life). He has provided what looks like a reference to a NASA document but has replaced its title with his own wording to make it appear as if NASA agrees with his crazy theory. I urge everyone to report the two posts it appears in as abuse."

Totally agree barakn! Oliver has posted here & on the "Say goodbye to cool summers" thread:

" 1. Neutron repulsion rocks the entire Sun [NASA, 13 Dec 2010].

//science1.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/13dec_globaleruption/"

A simple Google word search reveals the phrase "neutron repulsion" does NOT appear anywhere in his linked NASA story. Not even the words "neutron" or "repulsion". And twice he has made this claim.

Any explanation for this 'happenstance', Oliver?

(At the same time, Oliver claims NASA is hiding/altering data that shows neutron repulsion is an actual phenomena. What a hypocrite!)

omatumr
1 / 5 (3) Jun 11, 2011
Perhaps our questions about the Sun will be answered on Tuesday:

Yesterday evening Space.com reported a Major Result on the Sunspot Cycle to be Announced Tuesday June 14 at 1:00 pm EDT in New Mexico (Los Alamos National Laboratory?). Here is the story by Dr. Michael Wall:

www.space.com/119...iew.html

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Silverhill
5 / 5 (3) Jun 13, 2011
Neutron repulsion induces:
a.) Fission, and/or
b.) Neutron emission
That is why there is no minimum mass.
I'm not asking what neutrons might do, in great masses; I'm asking how a star whose mass is 30% below the Chandrasekhar limit can be a neutron star at all. (In order for there to be an old neutron star lurking at the solar core, there needs to be much more mass present than there is.)