Porsche is developing a system for a self-driving car, no pedal pressing needed

Jun 30, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog
Porsche is developing a system for a self-driving car, no pedal pressing needed

(PhysOrg.com) -- How much of the driving experience are you willing to give up to the computer in your car? Are you OK with cruise control? Anti-lock brakes? Skid control systems? How about taking your feet off of the pedals and letting the car decide how fast you should be going at any given moment, are you OK with that idea?

The engineers at the design team are betting that at least some drivers will be OK with that idea. They are working on a new, more advanced, cruise control system, called the ACC InnoDrive that will make having you feet on the pedals a thing of the past, at least for most of the ride.

The system, which is designed with safety and in mind, works like this. Over time, as you drive to the same places over and over again, you car begins to learn the route and estimates the speed limits, the curves in the road and any elevation changes over the route. It then takes this and uses it to create a trip profile that will do all of the pedal work in getting your from point A to point B. All you have to do is put your hands on the wheel and steer the car.

The only question now is how does the car know when the light ahead of you is red?

The system is currently in its prototype stages. The system's hardware is currently installed in a Porsche Panamera S. The system does have an off mode for user who prefers to driver his or her own cars.

Explore further: For Google's self-driving cars, learning to deal with the bizarre is essential

More information:
via Autoblog

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sstritt
2 / 5 (3) Jun 30, 2011
Don't these engineers realize that people who buy a Porsche WANT to drive a Porsche? Whats next- a steak dinner that eats itself?
DocBrown
not rated yet Jul 01, 2011
Certainly hope these self-drive computers don't use Windows based software otherwise the 'blue screen of death' could have rather different and literal meaning.
JadedIdealist
not rated yet Jul 01, 2011
Coool
Magnette
not rated yet Jul 05, 2011
It estimates the speed limits?

Sorry officer, my car thought it was a 40mph limit and not 30mph.
RandomTux1234
not rated yet Aug 05, 2011
highly reliable autopilot systems
in aviation just nned to be adapted
to the roadcar, and will one day.
the idea is not new.
but even a new idea for all its
benefits, will fail if consumers
are afraid to adopt it, so they are waiting
for a new gen of consumer who wants it

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