Nokia says Apple to pay royalties, ending patent disputes

Jun 14, 2011 by Aira-Katariina Vehaskari
The world's leading mobile phone maker Nokia said Tuesday that Apple had agreed to pay royalties for use of Nokia technology in its devices, ending all of their 46 ongoing patent disputes.

The world's leading mobile phone maker Nokia said Tuesday its competitor Apple had agreed to pay royalties for using Nokia technology in its devices, ending all of their ongoing patent disputes.

"The financial structure of the agreement consists of a one-time payment payable by Apple and on-going royalties to be paid by Apple to Nokia for the term of the agreement," Nokia said in a statement.

The Finnish mobile phone giant said details of the contract were confidential.

In a brief statement, Apple said "Apple and Nokia have agreed to drop all of our current lawsuits and enter into a license covering some of each others' patents, but not the majority of the innovations that make the iPhone unique.

"We're glad to put this behind us and get back to focusing on our respective businesses," Apple said.

The deal constitutes a massive victory for Nokia and brings to an end years of tit-for-tat suits that have seen Nokia file 46 complaints against Apple, which has hit back with numerous countersuits against the Finnish company.

Nokia said both companies had now agreed to withdraw all complaints they had filed with the US International Trade Commission.

"We are very pleased to have Apple join the growing number of Nokia licensees... This settlement demonstrates Nokia's industry leading patent portfolio," Nokia chief executive Stephen Elop said in the statement.

The Finnish company, which has been struggling to maintain its position as global market leader, also said the deal should have "a positive financial impact" on its second-quarter performance.

Just two weeks ago, Nokia warned that its sales for the quarter would be far worse than previously expected and that it could no longer give a full-year forecast, news which sent its share price to its lowest level since early 1998.

Nordea Bank analyst Sami Sarkamies said the one-time payment by Apple will have a powerful impact on Nokia's second quarter, and that the California tech giant would become one of Nokia's most significant patent clients.

"I believe that with the one-time payment we're talking about hundreds of millions of euros, because Apple hasn't paid anything for any of its iPhones that it's sold (with Nokia technology)," Sarkamies told AFP, adding however that future royalty payments would surely be smaller and less visible in quarterly results.

Sarkamies said he was sure the deal also included concessions to Apple for use of its non-essential patents, such as touchscreen technology, but that these payments were likely considerably smaller than what Apple would have to pay to use Nokia's essential patents.

Ending the disputes, which the companies had been fighting simultaneously in US and European courts, should boost morale at Nokia, which is struggling to reverse plummeting market share at the hands of Chinese manufacturers and smartphone rivals Apple and Google.

In February, Elop announced a radical last-ditch effort to turn around the ailing industry giant by phasing out its own smartphone platforms in favour of a partnership with Microsoft's operating system.

This was accompanied by complete corporate re-structuring, thousands of job cuts globally, and multiple credit rating downgrades.

"This is the first good news for Nokia in a very, very long time," Sarkamies said, adding that the agreement should also strengthen Nokia's position in patent rows with other companies in an industry he described as "a tangle of patent conflicts."

Explore further: IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Del. judge puts Nokia-Apple patent fight on hold

Mar 04, 2010

(AP) -- A federal judge in Delaware has agreed to put a patent fight between Apple Inc. and Finnish phone maker Nokia on hold pending resolution of their competing claims before the International Trade Commission.

Nokia expands patent dispute beyond Apple iPhone

Dec 29, 2009

(AP) -- Nokia Corp. is broadening a legal dispute it already has with Apple Inc. over the iPhone, saying almost all of the company's other products also violate the Finnish phone maker's patents.

US trade judge rules for Apple in Nokia dispute

Mar 26, 2011

A judge with the US International Trade Commission ruled in Apple's favor on Friday in a patent dispute with Finland's Nokia over mobile phones, portable music players and computers.

Recommended for you

Weibo IPO below expectations, raises $285.6 mn

6 hours ago

Sina Weibo sold fewer shares than expected in its US IPO which was priced below expectations ahead of a Thursday listing that takes place after tech selloffs on Wall Street.

'Chief Yahoo' David Filo returns to board

7 hours ago

Yahoo announced the nomination of three new board members, including company co-founder David Filo, who earned the nickname and formal job title of "Chief Yahoo."

Fired Yahoo exec gets $58M for 15 months of work

7 hours ago

Yahoo's recently fired chief operating officer, Henrique de Castro, left the Internet company with a severance package of $58 million even though he lasted just 15 months on the job.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump (Update)

17 hours ago

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exacerbated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Net neutrality balancing act

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

Bionic ankle 'emulates nature'

These days, Hugh Herr, an associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT, gets about 100 emails daily from people across the world interested in his bionic limbs.