LulzSec computer hackers release Arizona state files

Jun 24, 2011

Computer hackers who have hit the websites of the CIA, US Senate, Sony and others have released hundreds of documents from the Arizona Department of Public Safety (AZDPS) in their latest cyberattack.

The known as Lulz Security, which has claimed credit for a series of data thefts in recent weeks, provided a link to the more than 700 documents on their website, LulzSecurity.com.

Lulz Security, or LulzSec, said they were releasing the documents to protest Arizona's immigration laws.

"We are releasing hundreds of private intelligence bulletins, training manuals, personal email correspondence, names, phone numbers, addresses and passwords belonging to Arizona law enforcement," the group said in a statement.

"We are targeting AZDPS specifically because we are against SB1070 (the Arizona immigration law) and the racial profiling anti-immigrant police state that is Arizona," it said.

The documents include information on drug cartels, street gangs, informants, border patrol operations and the names and addresses of members of the Arizona Highway Patrol.

The AZDPS website, azdps.gov, was not responding on Friday.

"Every week we plan on releasing more classified and embarrassing personal details of military and law enforcement in an effort not just to reveal their racist and corrupt nature but to purposefully sabotage their efforts to terrorize communities fighting an unjust 'war on drugs,'" Lulz Security said.

A British teenager suspected of involvement with the Lulz Security hacking spree has been remanded in police custody in London.

Ryan Cleary, 19, was arrested on Monday at his home in Wickford, southeast England, as part of a probe by Scotland Yard and the US (FBI) into Lulz Security.

British police on Wednesday charged Cleary with targeting the website of Britain's Serious Organised Crime Agency -- the British equivalent of the FBI -- with a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack.

DDoS attacks overwhelm websites with requests, causing them to be slow or inaccessible.

Lulz has staged a number of DDoS attacks on websites, including that of the CIA, but the group has also carried out a number of largescale data thefts.

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User comments : 31

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Royale
3.9 / 5 (7) Jun 24, 2011
Hey I have to give them credit. This is the only way to fight the law anymore, when it becomes unjust. It's not like they could petition a law change. They've just taken 'hack the planet' to heart. Hacking will continue, and groups will continue to fight for what they believe in. I just hope this doesn't lead to bullets in the AZ Highway Patrol's families or into their informants.
Nikola
1 / 5 (2) Jun 24, 2011
Fun, Fun, Fun!
Milou
3.9 / 5 (7) Jun 24, 2011
Expose the stuff on ex-P. Bush and get him in jail. Then we can clean up the rest of our crap. Love these guys.
stealthc
3.5 / 5 (8) Jun 24, 2011
let's join them, it's about time the dirt of our leaders gets exposed so we can see just how badly we have been getting taken advantage of.
jimseo
3.9 / 5 (7) Jun 24, 2011
Government state files should be made accessible on Intranet and not internet.

Moreover, there is nothing which government should keep hidden from their own people.
Fritz
3 / 5 (2) Jun 24, 2011
Ok, they've demonstrated they can hack the best systems. Here's the challenge: if they are truly citizens and wanted in good faith to show that system security in general sucks, can they design systems that are unhackable, in particular by other nations, and, if they do so, will our country and authorities not only grant them amnesty, but immunity for past hacks?
evropej
1.8 / 5 (5) Jun 24, 2011
Let me get this right, people who are breaking the law are trying to expose people who are breaking the law? ROFL. The only credit belongs to the fact that their security sucks or credit should be given to their ability to hack.

You got to love the Bush basher and all tin foil hat theories.
iPan
3.3 / 5 (4) Jun 24, 2011
The sooner the authorities realize that we are inevitably progressing toward a transparent sousveillance society, the less conflict and tragedy we will experience.

They can't fight this, it's evolution.
OHHumble
3.7 / 5 (6) Jun 24, 2011
Moreover, there is nothing which government should keep hidden from their own people.


Did it ever occur to you that a great deal of information the government keeps is actually private information of its citizens?

Citizen tax records, medical records, business records, applications for patents, aid, loans... the list goes on and on. So all that stuff should just be released to everyone, yes?

How about the names of rape victims? The names of people investigated for heinous crimes (child molestation, for example) where the police find accusations baseless? How about your birthday, SSN and mother's maiden name? The government has all this stuff. According to you, I should have it to.

RustyMustard
4.4 / 5 (7) Jun 24, 2011
Let me get this right, people who are breaking the law are trying to expose people who are breaking the law? ROFL. The only credit belongs to the fact that their security sucks or credit should be given to their ability to hack.


Yep, when those who control the system break the law, there's not much use in pursuing it through their crooked system of laws.

Maybe if this was done in the past, my generation would have grown up in a world that wasn't built on terror, lies, injustice, exploitation, and greed.

Now the only way out of this putrid condition of "life" is by going around the system engineered to keep you all as slaves. I applaud their efforts, they're actually doing something more than sulking about it via the crooked system and it's unjust laws.
OHHumble
2 / 5 (4) Jun 24, 2011
The sooner the authorities realize that we are inevitably progressing toward a transparent sousveillance society, the less conflict and tragedy we will experience.

They can't fight this, it's evolution.


Spoken like someone who has never even heard of a public records request, attended a city council meeting, or even written a letter to his/her congress person.
J-n
5 / 5 (2) Jun 24, 2011
There are systems that are extremely difficult to hack. The problem is not always the Software, but the people using it.

1. If the secure information was not on the same network as computers with internet access then these hacks would have never been possible.

2. People are a problem. People tend to use easy passwords, they fall for phishing attempts, they visit random websites that are e-mailed to them, ETC...

3. Management often requests loopholes in security for ease of use. For instance, here we have password complexity requirements that are strictly adhered to, except in the case of some management who find the requirements "too difficult to remember" so have deemed themselves exempt.

These are the sorts of problems that create very easy vectors for attack... That combined with using Windows makes breaking into a website, or a network, not all that difficult.
OHHumble
3.4 / 5 (5) Jun 24, 2011
let's join them, it's about time the dirt of our leaders gets exposed so we can see just how badly we have been getting taken advantage of.


But that's not what they did. They released information from the Department of Public Safety. Do you know what that means? Seriously, did you stop for even a second and ask yourself "what have these guys actually done?"

What they did is release information from a part of the AZ government that is largely AGAINST SB1070. (And just as a funny, I bet you don't even know what SB stands for). AZ law enforcement is not all that happy about this law. It will cause them all manner of headaches and subject them to responsibilities that will tee up one civil rights lawsuit after then next.

I know you think Lulz is cool and maybe you've watched "V for Vendetta" a few too many times. But these guys are hurting good people.
evropej
3 / 5 (4) Jun 24, 2011
I have a feeling this technical article is going to be hijacked by Bush bashers, just a feeling lol.
J-n
1 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2011
We are releasing hundreds of private intelligence bulletins, training manuals, personal email correspondence, names, phone numbers, addresses and passwords belonging to Arizona law enforcement,


Personal e-mail correspondence, on a state owned computer?! It's my computer anyway, i'd like to see what's done on those computers on time i'm paying them for.

Passwords should be regularly changed anyway, and you shouldnt be using the same password on multiple sites, so releasing their passwords shouldn't be a big deal (if my company was hacked i'd have everyone change their passwords the next day anyway).

Names addresses phone numbers.. all publicly available info.

Training manuals are easy enough to get.

The only part here that may be iffy are the private intelligence bulletins, but i suspect they're releasing those to embarrass the police dept.

According to what i've been able to see the police chiefs didn't like it, but the rank and file approved of Senate Bill(SB)1070.
J-n
4 / 5 (4) Jun 24, 2011
Additionally LulZ (And MANY others) would say that SB1070's "Show me your Papers cause you're darker than white" hurts FAR more people than releasing some records from AZ's police dept.

The younger generations are finding the reality that methods like this are the only real way to fight back against what they precive as injustice. I've been to town hall meetings, writen letters to my representatives at local, state, and national levels.

The problem is that people are not equally listened to, Minority views are not respected. Even majority views that aren't aligned with the leanings of the political figure are ignored.

This particular attack was against a public institution. Think of it like a sit-in, that actually might affect something. (Remember even LARGE public protest does not stop politicians from doing what they feel like, think of the thousands of teachers, and their supporters in Wisconsin being ignored as their rights to free association, and unionization are trampled)
OHHumble
1 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2011
Additionally LulZ (And MANY others) would say that SB1070's "Show me your Papers cause you're darker than white" hurts FAR more people than releasing some records from AZ's police dept.


So it's a bad law. It's in the courts now. It may survive, it may not. But there will be powerful reasons for the outcome.

And if this law does manage to get through the courts, AZ will suffer its impacts. It already has. Businesses are leaving, conventions are cancelling and there is great dissatisfaction in AZ. Political winds can change, and the law can be overturned later. But even if it's not, AZ does have some right to run it's own show. Dear god, man, it's one of 50 states... not the planet!

And the political process is slow and a pain. Yes. Injustice is everywhere you look. But do you really think a group of hackers is going to change that? They'll do their damage and move on, and AZ will be right back where it is. Hashing out this stupid law in the courts and among its own citizenry.
emsquared
4 / 5 (4) Jun 24, 2011
I applaud organizations like wiki-leaks and lulz in general however, given the unabated ruthlessness of the Mexican drug cartels, I think releasing LEO addresses was outside the realm of respectable activism.
J-n
5 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2011
But do you really think a group of hackers is going to change that?


No, i don't think they'll be able to change anything. how long has it been, though, since the bill has been in the news? How often are the business objections, personal objections, etc publicized?

You are right though, the actual hack, and the information release will do little to directly influence any of the decisions made by those in power. I do think it has brought this issue back into the public eye. Maybe reminding people that there are a group of racist politicians pandering to some racist voters, and maybe inciting another round of public outcry over this issue.

While it is only one of our states, issues like this are why people in other nations are loosing respect for us, and our way of politics. Imagine what politicians in other nations think when we admonish them for not allowing refugees from other nations in, while we institute laws like this.
J-n
5 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2011
I think releasing LEO addresses was outside the realm of respectable activism.


If the drug cartels wanted the addresses themselves they could get them. Give me your name and the state you live in i'll find your address phone number. No problem.

The only information that was not subject to public scrutiny are the Training documents (which are still pretty easy to get) Passwords (which should be changed IMMEDIATELY after ANY hacking attempt anyway) and the private intelligence bulletins, which i admit could contain some information that would be best left out of the hands of true criminals. Then again why would they even have them on a publically accessible computer (connected to the internet) if they should be kept secret?

The only reason to have them on a computer connected to the internet is so they can be distributed outside of the organization. Why would anyone need to be e-mailed these documents, or have them accessible from home or whatever?

OHHumble
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 24, 2011
.... [I]ssues like this are why people in other nations are loosing respect for us, and our way of politics.


I doubt the world cares much about this law, especially since it hasn't been put into effect. The fact that we've had an overactive tendency to drop bombs on foreign countries ... not good PR.

About publicity. Yeah, there's a silver lining, mostly for lack of security. But Lulz should not be our town-crier.

From the way you're talking, you sound like you're American, like me. And here's the thing. the USA is our country, our house. We have our rules, we have our fights, we have our crazies, we have our sages. But it's OUR house and these are OUR problems.

Lulz, from what we know, is not a group of frustrated AZ kids or even American. They are using disproportionally powerful technology to kick over our cabinets, rifle through our drawers and expose our dirty laundry.

Our house. Our problems. Lulz does not belong, even if our kid sister thinks they're dreamy.
emsquared
3 / 5 (2) Jun 24, 2011
If the drug cartels wanted the addresses themselves they could get them. Give me your name and the state you live in i'll find your address phone number. No problem.

Agreed, but it'd take a much more considerable investment of resources for each person, now it takes nothing at all, not to mention people with common names would be all but indistinguishable, also these individuals didn't have anything more to do with this bill than the rest of the state, why victimize them? I know this word gets thrown around way too much, but it's terrorism, many of these LEOs are probably now in fear for their life.
Imagine what politicians in other nations think...

Also, I'm pretty sure aside from Canada, Northern Europe and maybe Australia, the U.S. has the high-ground on civil liberties over most countries. And considering our much much higher population (when looking at the state of civil liberties in the other highest population countries), I think that's pretty respectable.

Cont'd
emsquared
3 / 5 (2) Jun 24, 2011
Which obviously were far from perfect, and I'm certainly not defending the anti-immigration legislation, I'm of the "we're all the sons and daughters of immigrants" camp, but I guess I'm just putting myself in the place of some officer who put away some drug dealers brother or something, what did I do that deserves this violation of privacy? It just doesn't seem right.
ShotmanMaslo
1 / 5 (1) Jun 25, 2011
I hope Arizona government wont get intimidated by this, and will enforce the law. On the other hand, more transparency is always welcomed. Its a win-win situation, lol.
jmcenanly
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 25, 2011
If any members of the Arizona Department of Public safety are harmed, Lulz Security should be held fully responsible. Right now, our southern border is under siege from Mexican drug cartels. These people make the Mafia look like Rotarians.
Isaacsname
not rated yet Jun 25, 2011
No force without counter-force.

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

hhmmm ?
PB94941
1 / 5 (1) Jun 25, 2011
Name: Rafael Xavier de Lima
Nicks: Sabu, Xavier, Kaotico, Phorphu and kaosloco
Age: 30 as of 2011-06-21
Gender: Male
Nationality: Brazilian
Languages: English and Portugese
Possible Languages: Spanish
Websites: sabu.net, pure-elite.org, confinement.org and p-e.org
Profession: Student and Software Analyst/Developer at Savoir Faire/NCR Brasil
Education: Universidade Estadual Paulista 'Júlio de Mesquita Filho'
Interests: Python programming, Linux, network security, exploit development and Counter Strike
Email: sabu@pure-elite.org, xavier@pure-elite.org, xavier@sentinix.org, xavier@tigerteam.se and sabu@prvt.org
Possible Emails: rafael.xavier.lima@gmail.com and kaosloco321@gmail.com
Location: Curitiba e redondezas, Brasil
Address: Street Brasílio Itiberê, 4270 p 807 Água Verde - Curitiba - PR
Telephone: (41) 3359-3889
FrankHerbert
0.7 / 5 (49) Jun 25, 2011
Don't you think this is a little hypocritical,
Our house. Our problems. Lulz does not belong, even if our kid sister thinks they're dreamy.

given that this is true?
The fact that we've had an overactive tendency to drop bombs on foreign countries ... not good PR.
FrankHerbert
0.8 / 5 (49) Jun 25, 2011
Will Turner (PB94941), you may not want to use such a unique handle across so many websites. It makes it very easy to mine your information, especially when you have your name and so much personal info attached to your accounts, all under the same name.

Have fun googling through 3 million sites on Dune before you dig up any info on me ;-)
Sebastien_Gagnon
5 / 5 (1) Jun 25, 2011
Hacking is a touchy subject, the number of replies on the article only proves it further. ONE could hack for a lot of things, and the law is not necessarily what is good and just, therefore we got ourselves the perfect conditions for the apparition of groups such as LulzSec that thinks they do the right thing; perhaps they do but one thing is certain: in the end i agree that they should be directly accountable for negative impacts on the families of the policemen exposed. One could argue that it is for the greater good; i don't know about that and only the future will tell, but it sure doesn't look good.
tjcoop3
4 / 5 (4) Jun 25, 2011
but it's terrorism, many of these LEOs are probably now in fear for their life.

---------------------------------------------------------
LEO's fearing for their life is a good thing. I really don't see a downside here since so many of them think it is OK and even ideal that anyone they target should fear them.

Their intimidation is seen more and more with a wide variety of groups and individuals including peaceful protesters. Try videoing them as they beat and taser someone if you think these LEO's shouldn't have a bit of fear put into them.

Most do not believe you have a right to document possible rights violations of other citizens. We should all just trust they always do the right thing since they are "the law"

Many cops are a bigger problem to our freedoms and liberties and our safety than any drug cartels.

BTW legalizing and regulating drugs would eliminate the cartels overnight just as it did with much of the organized crime violence created by alcohol prohibition.