Lulz hackers say attacks are entertainment

Jun 17, 2011

Computer hackers who have hit the websites of the CIA, US Senate, Sony and others during a month-long rampage said Friday that they were staging the attacks for their own entertainment.

"You find it funny to watch havoc unfold, and we find it funny to cause it," the hacker group known as Lulz Security said in a 750-word online "manifesto."

"For the past month and a bit, we've been causing mayhem and chaos throughout the Internet, attacking several targets including PBS, Sony, Fox, porn websites, FBI, CIA, the US government, Sony some more, online gaming servers," Lulz said.

"While we've gained many, many supporters, we do have a mass of enemies, albeit mainly gamers," Lulz said, adding that they were not concerned.

"This is the lulz lizard era, where we do things just because we find it entertaining," said Lulz, whose name is a derivative of the text shorthand for LOL, or "laugh out loud."

"This is the Internet, where we screw each other over for a jolt of satisfaction," the group said.

"We release so that equally evil people can entertain us with what they do with it," Lulz said. "And that's all there is to it, that's what appeals to our Internet generation.

"We're attracted to fast-changing scenarios, we can't stand repetitiveness, and we want our shot of entertainment or we just go and browse something else, like an unimpressed zombie," Lulz said.

The group said it will "continue creating things that are exciting and new until we're brought to justice, which we might well be."

Lulz has released tens of thousands of user names and passwords in recent weeks but the group said Friday they were "sitting on" the personal information of 200,000 users of the Brink videogame.

"It might make you feel safe knowing we told you, so that Brink users may change their passwords," Lulz said.

On Wednesday, Lulz knocked the CIA's public website, cia.gov, out of commission for about two hours.

Lulz, in a message on their Twitter feed @LulzSec on Friday, also denied reports that they were in conflict with the Anonymous, from which Lulz is believed to have formed.

"To confirm, we aren't going after Anonymous," Lulz said.

Anonymous has been staging cyberattacks for years on companies cracking down on music and movie piracy and gained notoriety last year with cyberattacks in support of controversial website WikiLeaks.

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User comments : 17

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NANOBRAIN
1.4 / 5 (9) Jun 17, 2011
Very harsh punishment must be done to all hackers.This world has to many problems.Lets all track them down and destroy them all.Lives have been seriously ruined by them.
zevkirsh
1 / 5 (4) Jun 17, 2011
i don't buy it
Recovering_Human
5 / 5 (5) Jun 17, 2011
So, one might say they did it "for the lulz?"
Skultch
2.8 / 5 (6) Jun 17, 2011
Wow. More media out there than any one can consume, endless "real" fun outdoors, and these guys are so bored, they will risk years of their freedom for a fleeting laugh. I don't get it. I guess I'm just an old timer now.
Doschx
3.8 / 5 (4) Jun 18, 2011
Look well, these are your modern freedom fighters on the virtual front lines, jaded and hardened towards the internet and society the same way soldiers are hardened towards enemy fire (and society too). Some people are built to fight, even when they don't know what they're fighting for.

If they (all hackers) suddenly go silent, be afraid. The death of freedom will come with stark silence.
chthonic
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 18, 2011
Generically, these are empty, lonely people who originally were disappointed and thus enraged at parents, leading to a displacement of rage and attacks on The Establishment. They know they're doing wrong and almost seem to be pleading for an outside agency to stop them and thereby show they care, in the same way a kid "acts out", since even negative, punishing parental attention is better than the emotional black hole of parental indifference. Apparently hugs, and a modicum of love that would have given self-cohesion, weren't in the offing, so now the only contact they have is to 'screw each other for a jolt of satisfaction', and this done by tapping on keys in front of a glowing monitor. I'm only saying that's how they got this way; I'm not advocating for amnesty toward them of any kind. Voltaire advocated that mankind's work is to tend his garden; I'd say we've messed the hell out of that garden!
Bob_Kob
4 / 5 (5) Jun 18, 2011
They're highlighting the extreme unreadiness of security on the net. They even say themselves there are hackers out there that have information but do not publicly release it. Nobody would know. Its a form of survival arms race, they kick companies out of their protective bubbles and make them actually develop stronger solutions.
MarkyMark
1.8 / 5 (5) Jun 18, 2011
In other words they are a##holes, not political activists or as someone here called them 'freedom fighters'. When i think of them i easilly picture that guy in the world of warcraft episode in southpark stuffing hot pockets into his maw. In otherwords they are cyber terrorists/Anarchists plain and simple.
massnerder
3.9 / 5 (7) Jun 18, 2011
Although from a certain perspective, you could argue that they are freedom fighters. Most of the internet is owned by corporations, who determine what constitutes "appropriate" content, thus determining what information is available. No information, no informed thinking. Any time someone interferes with this process, it is (in a twisted way) a blow for free thinking.
Skultch
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 18, 2011
All you defending these guys as freedom fighters are missing the obvious. They admit they are ONLY doing it for the fun of it. Your defense is misplaced on this one. What if they took down YOUR favorite sites, and for no good reason? What if they took down Physorg for a week, or a month? Your school's site? Your private business? Not all hackers are Robin Hood. Some are just bored anarchists who haven't realized what civil society is good for yet.
poof
3 / 5 (4) Jun 18, 2011
All you defending these guys as freedom fighters are missing the obvious. They admit they are ONLY doing it for the fun of it. Your defense is misplaced on this one. What if they took down YOUR favorite sites, and for no good reason? What if they took down Physorg for a week, or a month? Your school's site? Your private business? Not all hackers are Robin Hood. Some are just bored anarchists who haven't realized what civil society is good for yet.


Then i'd send them a thank you note for a month of not having to read comments written at an 8th grade comprehension level. Who cares why they do it, they're fucking over lazy corporations who dont give a damn about your personal or financial information. I'd rather it be someone who discloses their actions and gives people a head start than someone who wants to silently empty my bank account.

Srsly, hate the problem, not the symptom.
Zak_Mc_Kee
not rated yet Jun 18, 2011
I would much rather someone take our governments sites down jokingly, and give a chance for patching what wouldn't need patched if it was made right in the first place, than someone trying to do real harm find an opening. I would bet money someone in the group had tried to warn of a possible problem and got ignored. My opinion does not mean I stand for ether side.
Jotaf
not rated yet Jun 19, 2011
No one was harmed. A little crazy is good, new generations always rebel in some way, this is theirs.

Plus, they provide a valuable service -- security will improve a lot so the real criminals don't get to steal other people's money.

"For the lulz". I like it!
Skultch
1 / 5 (1) Jun 19, 2011
Srsly, hate the problem, not the symptom.


You're preaching to the choir. This isn't a story about Anonymous or some security group giving heads ups. What don't you get about THEIR STATEMENTS? They don't care about your information or improving security. They only care about themselves. Doing you a favor is an ACCIDENT. Eventually, they would screw you over and not give two craps. If everyone had great security, they wouldn't be able to have their laughs. So, their purpose is actually opposed to your security interests. Their methods may be the same as altruistic hackers. That's it.
Skultch
1 / 5 (1) Jun 19, 2011
No one was harmed.


False. People paid real money for services, then couldn't get them(PBS,Sony,porn). More tax dollars are now going to increase the security on simple info sites (CIA,FBI). Nothing these guys did will have ANY impact on the security of real operations. But, they still have to have an online presence, so they have to fix the sites, and for no good reason.

If these guys had political issues with CIA/FBI, I would be with some of you. But, they publicly state no such issue.

It's random harm. It's not constructive. Their are actual groups out there that are doing the things you guys /think/ this group /might/ be doing. Why make these assumptions? Do you guys just think hacking is cool, and that's it?
poof
not rated yet Jun 19, 2011
No one was harmed.


False. People paid real money for services, then couldn't get them(PBS,Sony,porn). More tax dollars are now going to increase the security on simple info sites (CIA,FBI). Nothing these guys did will have ANY impact on the security of real operations. But, they still have to have an online presence, so they have to fix the sites, and for no good reason.

If these guys had political issues with CIA/FBI, I would be with some of you. But, they publicly state no such issue.

It's random harm. It's not constructive. Their are actual groups out there that are doing the things you guys /think/ this group /might/ be doing. Why make these assumptions? Do you guys just think hacking is cool, and that's it?


Well, even if the corps dont fix the problems, at least we'll know who not to do business with.

See, they're doing this for a good cause even if they dont admit to it. Lulzhackers: putting bad business out of business.
ziphead
1 / 5 (1) Jun 19, 2011
Clockwork orange.
The kids may have seen it few times too many. Although perhaps they did not have the attention span to see the ending.

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