iOnRoad: An augmented reality app that makes driving safer

Jun 29, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Picitup, an Israeli technology company founded in 2007, has announced the launch of a new product, the iOnRoad that is designed to help end users to become aware of future dangers in the road, increasing possible response times and hopefully helping drivers to make better decisions.

The announcement, which was made at the Israel Mobile Summit, at the summit the iOnRoad, also took home the first place award in the Israel Mobile Summit Startup Contest. The contest also featured 23 other start-ups from the region.

Generally, the idea of using a smart phone while you are driving is not generally considered to be a good one. As a matte of fact many studies have shown the dangers or driving and talking, or texting, at the same time. Not that this stops people from doing it anyway. 93% of drivers engage in distracted , according to a 2010 US poll conducted by InsuranceQuotes.com. 25% of police reported crashes involve a cell phone use in on way or another.

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App demo video

The iOnRoad hopes to change this by making use of the technology built into most phones. The uses the camera on a to locate vehicles on the road. With constant mapping the screen keeps a real time view of the road and gives users a heads up when they are potentially in danger. The warning consists of both a visual and an audio warning.

The app is set to launch in Mid July for Android-based . Other operating systems for smartphones will be supported in future versions of the app. The company hopes to have those out by the end of this summer.

Explore further: Android gains in US, basic phones almost extinct

More information: App website and press release

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FroShow
not rated yet Jun 30, 2011
the idea of using a smart phone while you are driving is not generally considered to be a good one.

No kidding!
Even if the distraction is something intended to make driving safer, I think this might just make drivers more complacent and therefore more dangerous.
I'd rather an app that watches the driver and screams at them when they let themselves get distracted. ("EYES ON THE ROAD DUMBASS", "DROP THE CANNOLI!", "DON'T PEE IN THAT BOTTLE: PULL OVER!")
Now, integrate this tech into a HUD and maybe I'd like it more.
That being said, technology is no substitute for common sense. (I am constantly amazed though at how uncommon common sense is.)

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