Hackers claim another Sony attack

Jun 07, 2011
Hackers claimed to have staged another attack on Japanese electronics giant Sony, publishing online a file containing source code for the Sony Computer Entertainment Developer Network.

Hackers claimed to have staged another attack on Japanese electronics giant Sony, publishing online a file containing source code for the Sony Computer Entertainment Developer Network.

The claim was made by a group of hackers known as Lulz Security, who said last week they had compromised more than one million passwords, email addresses and other information from SonyPictures.com.

"Presenting Developer Network source code," Lulz Security said in a message on its Twitter feed @LulzSec which provided a link to a 54-megabyte file.

The group also posted a link to what it said were internal network maps of music arm .

"That's hackers 16, Sony 0. Your move!" the group said in a reference to what it said was the number of cyberattacks on Sony's online networks in recent weeks.

Sony Pictures Entertainment apologized over the weekend for the personal data breach at SonyPictures.com, which features movie trailers and email updates on upcoming releases.

Sony's PlayStation Network, its Qriocity music and are among other services targeted by hackers recently.

File photo shows a customer watching a Sony videogame PlayStation 3 at a Tokyo electric shop. Sony's PlayStation Network, its Qriocity music streaming service and Sony Online Entertainment are among other services targeted by hackers recently.

The company has also suffered attacks on websites in Greece, Thailand and Indonesia and on the Canadian site of .

According to Sony, more than 100 million accounts have been affected, making it one of the largest data breaches ever.

In addition to the Sony attacks, Lulz Security has claimed to have stolen email addresses and passwords from associates of an FBI-affiliated security program called InfraGard.

Lulz Security said it attacked the website of the Atlanta chapter of InfraGard in retaliation for US efforts to classify hacking as an act of war.

Lulz Security published a list online of around 180 email addresses and passwords which the group said were obtained from the InfraGard website.

On its website, InfraGard describes itself as a partnership between the FBI and the private sector "dedicated to sharing information and intelligence to prevent hostile acts against the United States."

Its members include businesses, academic institutions, state and local law enforcement agencies, and others.

In late May, Lulz Security targeted the website of the US non-profit Public Broadcasting Service in retaliation for a film it made about WikiLeaks called "Frontline: Wiki Secrets."

The hackers marred PBS Web pages with graffiti, exposed account information of member stations, and posted a fake story about the late rap musician Tupac Shakur being alive in New Zealand.

Explore further: Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Hackers claim new Sony cyberattack

Jun 03, 2011

Hackers have claimed to have compromised more than one million passwords, email addresses and other information from SonyPictures.com in the latest cyberattack on the Japanese electronics giant.

Hackers claim stealing SonyPictures.com passwords

Jun 02, 2011

Hackers claimed on Thursday to have stolen more than one million passwords, email addresses and other information from SonyPictures.com in the latest cyberattack on the Japanese electronics giant.

Spotlight falls on Sony's troubled cybersecurity

Jun 03, 2011

(AP) -- Another massive data breach at Sony has left hackers exulting, customers steaming and security experts questioning why basic fixes haven't been made to the company's stricken cybersecurity program.

More Sony websites hacked, 8,500 Greek accounts hit

May 24, 2011

Sony on Tuesday said its websites in three countries had been hacked with 8,500 Greek user accounts compromised, in a blow to efforts to restore confidence after a huge data breach affecting millions.

Recommended for you

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

2 hours ago

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

5 hours ago

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 7

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Lord_jag
not rated yet Jun 07, 2011
When will Sony stop taking peoples personal information for granted?

I wonder how long people will put up with this before canceling service.
epsi00
not rated yet Jun 07, 2011
It's not the usual "someone is asleep at the switch", it's "everyone is asleep at the switch" or maybe even hibernating. When they wake up, the customers will be long gone. What does it take for Sony to react? This is the definition of incompetence.
CSharpner
5 / 5 (2) Jun 07, 2011
They're more interested in robbing grandmothers of their retirement because their grand kid downloaded a song from Grandma's house last summer when visiting.
Deadbolt
1 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2011
Is it Sony's incompetence, or the hackers skills and will to do it?

No system is unbreakable. Sony may be being careless enough to not even meet the standard, of course.
CSharpner
5 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2011
It's Sony's incompetence. The 2nd PSN hack, after Sony spent a full month or more to rebuild their network, they hackers used the simplest of simplest of hacks... a SQL injection attack. The hackers even said something like, hey, it's not like we're claiming we're skilled here, what we did was embarrassingly simple.

Reminds me of a couple years ago when Sony secretely put SOFTWARE on their MUSIC CDs so that when LEGITIMATE customers put their legally purchased CDs into their PCs, the software automatically, and secretely installed a root kit (poorly written) on their PC that actively hid the software. The software prevented you from ripping your CDs and opened major security holes. I believe it was the sys internals guy that discovered it. Sony denied at first, but then finally admitted it when it was proven. They then offered a "fix" that required the customers to sign up for Sony spam to get it, and. It opened MORE holes. Play by THEIR rules and they hack your PC. Disgusting
J-n
not rated yet Jun 07, 2011
Maybe the folks who did Sony's webdesign were asleep on the watch, but to store usernames and passwords in PLAIN TEXT is just short of BEGGING to have the information stolen.
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Jun 07, 2011
Rollie, oh rollie... Save us. Save SONY from this horrible torment.

More news stories

Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

(Phys.org) —Quantenna Communications has announced that it has plans for releasing a chipset that will be capable of delivering 10Gbps WiFi to/from routers, bridges and computers by sometime next year. ...

Unlocking secrets of new solar material

(Phys.org) —A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have ...

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

New US-Spanish firm says targets rich mobile ad market

Spanish telecoms firm Telefonica and US investment giant Blackstone launched a mobile telephone advertising venture on Wednesday, challenging internet giants such as Google and Facebook in a multi-billion-dollar ...