Hackers breach US Senate website (Update)

Jun 13, 2011
The dome of the US Capitol is pictured in Washington, DC. A shadowy group of hackers behind a string of recent cyberattacks claimed on Monday to have stolen internal data from the US Senate website.

A shadowy group of hackers behind a string of recent cyberattacks claimed on Monday to have breached the US Senate website and taken internal data.

The Senate Sergeant at Arms, which is responsible for congressional security, confirmed there had been an intrusion into the server hosting the public website, Senate.gov, but said no sensitive information was compromised.

The hacker group, which goes by the name of "Lulz Security," published files online at lulzsecurity.com said to have been swiped from Senate.gov.

"This is a small, just-for-kicks release of some internal data from Senate.gov -- is this an act of war, gentlemen?" Lulz Security said in a statement.

"We don't like the US government very much," the group added. "Their sites aren't very secure."

The Sergeant at Arms said Senate computer security staff had discovered an "unauthorized access" over the weekend into the server hosting Senate.gov.

"The intruder did not gain access into the Senate computer network and was only able to read and determine the directory structure of the files placed on Senate.gov," the Sergeant at Arms said in a statement.

"That server is for public access on the public side of the Senate's network firewall, and any files that individual Senate offices place there are intended for public consumption," it said.

The Sergeant at Arms said the intruders took advantage of a vulnerability in a portion of the website that is maintained by an individual Senate office.

"Although this intrusion is inconvenient, it does not compromise the security of the Senate's network, its members or staff," the Sergeant at Arms said.

"Specifically, there is no individual user account information on the server supporting Senate.gov that could have been compromised," it said.

The Sergeant at Arms said it would be conducting a security review of all of the sites hosted on Senate.gov.

Lulz Security, whose name is derived from the text-messaging shorthand phrase LOL, or "laugh out loud," has claimed credit for a series of cyberattacks in recent weeks.

The targets have included Sony's online operations, an FBI partner website, the website of videogame developer Bethesda Softworks and the website of the US non-profit Public Broadcasting Service.

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User comments : 9

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DoubleD
5 / 5 (1) Jun 13, 2011
Somebody is gonna get caught and all these hacks pinned on them. Its gonna be ugly. Not hatin, just sayin.
Fig1024
3 / 5 (6) Jun 13, 2011
So far LulzSec didn't show any truly malicious intent. At least I haven't heard of them stealing money from credit cards or selling private emails. At this point, I trust them more than the US government.
And as for personal privacy, I know the US government can violate my rights any time it wants to.
TabulaMentis
not rated yet Jun 13, 2011
Somebody is gonna get caught and all these hacks pinned on them. Its gonna be ugly. Not hatin, just sayin.
If the US goes bankrupt, then the people who have voted to raise the debt ceiling year after year since 2001 may also need to worry about getting hacked, including their beneficiaries!
JRDarby
not rated yet Jun 13, 2011
Yes, TM, there is talk of them hacking the Federal Reserve next.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Jun 13, 2011
So. In the near future everyone will get their money stolen and it will have to be declared worthless in order to keep the thieves from buying everything of value.

Is this how capitalism ends? The state owns everything to keep it out of the hands of criminals?? This will take a little time to digest. Perhaps ryggemarjons free markets mean 'free for the taking'.
kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (3) Jun 14, 2011
Then we'll have to have a means of identification implanted under the skin or in the forehead, identifying everyone as being able to buy and sell. Something containing a meaning of 666....

One wonders if these hacking attacks are not related to a certain worm infestation in Iranian nuclear reactors? Just wondering, since it would be the logical response. Practice on some innocent commercial entity's computers and then launch into the real enemy. Just a thought.
maxcypher
not rated yet Jun 14, 2011
This is the time when we muddle about in so-called 'cyberspace'. A lot of people, corps, and countries will be hurt, but that's how it works during transition times. Eventually, we will create an internet immune system (out of evolutionary necessity) that reliably identifies what is 'self' and what is 'other'. At that point, things will stabilize a bit more. Not a lot more; but a bit more.
Deadbolt
1 / 5 (1) Jun 14, 2011
Couldn't they have been focused on this earlier, instead of messing about with an electronics company?
frajo
not rated yet Jun 18, 2011
So far LulzSec didn't show any truly malicious intent. At least I haven't heard of them stealing money from credit cards or selling private emails.
True.

At this point, I trust them more than the US government.
They seem to be a false flag operation "cooperating" with the government to help induce public animosity against truly political movements like "anonymous", Pirate Bay, and Wikileaks.

And as for personal privacy, I know the US government can violate my rights any time it wants to.
True.