Google doodle pays tribute to guitarist Les Paul

June 9, 2011
Google has paid tribute to US guitar legend Les Paul, seen here in 2005, by transforming the celebrated logo on its homepage into a guitar which plays when strummed with a computer mouse.

Google paid tribute to US guitar legend Les Paul on Thursday by transforming the celebrated logo on its homepage into a guitar which plays when strummed with a computer mouse.

The six strings on the guitar, which is shaped to spell out the name of the Internet search giant, each play a different note when touched with the cursor and light up in the Google colors of red, blue, green and yellow.

A composition can also be recorded and played back.

Les Paul, a virtuoso guitarist and inventor who shaped the sound of rock 'n roll, was born on June 9, 1915 and died on August 12, 2009. He helped pioneer solid-bodied electric guitars and multitrack recording.

The Mountain View, California-based frequently changes the "" on its famously spartan homepage to mark anniversaries or significant events or pay tribute to artists, scientists, statesmen and others.

Explore further: Google replaces logo with dancing doodle

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