Germany advises against homegrown sprouts

Jun 13, 2011

(AP) -- Authorities are advising Germans not to eat raw homegrown sprouts, pointing to suspicions that the seeds may be one cause of the country's deadly E. coli outbreak.

Officials on Friday traced the outbreak to sprouts from a farm in northern Germany but are still puzzling over how the bacteria got there - whether through workers, seeds or by other means.

The federal agency said authorities suspect homegrown sprouts may be behind one infection in a family in northern Germany - though it says tests so far haven't found the bacteria in the seeds.

Authorities already had issued a wider warning against eating raw sprouts. The aggressive strain of E. coli has been blamed for 36 deaths, all but one of them in Germany.

Explore further: Older women restrict driving more than older men

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Germany still seeking reason for E. coli outbreak

Jun 13, 2011

(AP) -- German authorities said Sunday that they haven't yet been able to resolve how sprouts at a farm became contaminated with an aggressive strain of E. coli that has been blamed for 35 deaths.

Germany: outbreak waning, but more deaths possible

Jun 11, 2011

(AP) -- Germany's health minister says he's hopeful that the worst of an E. coli outbreak blamed on sprouts is over - but he is warning that the number of deaths, now at 33, may still increase.

E. coli outbreak blamed on German veggie sprouts

Jun 06, 2011

(AP) -- The terrifying E. coli outbreak in Europe appears to have been caused by vegetable sprouts grown on an organic farm in Germany, an agriculture official said Sunday as the toll climbed to at least ...

Finally, an E. coli answer: It was the sprouts

Jun 10, 2011

Specialists in high-tech labs tested thousands of vegetables as they hunted for the source of world's deadliest E. coli outbreak, but in the end it was old-fashioned detective work that provided the answer: ...

Deadly E. Coli in Germany: a timeline

Jun 10, 2011

Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), which has sparked a food-health scare in Germany, has already killed 31 people and infected 3,000 since the first cases were reported on May 24.

Recommended for you

Older women restrict driving more than older men

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—Older women restrict their driving activity more than older men, regardless of physical health or cognitive status, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of th ...

Alcohol apps aimed at young

10 hours ago

Apps with names like 'Let's get Wasted!' and 'Drink Thin' have led a James Cook University Professor to call for Government action on alcohol advertising on mobile devices.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.