German managers 'keep phones in biscuit tins'

Jun 27, 2011
A German chemicals company said on Monday its managers have begun keeping their mobile phones in biscuit tins during meetings in order to guard against industrial espionage.

A German chemicals company said on Monday its managers have begun keeping their mobile phones in biscuit tins during meetings in order to guard against industrial espionage.

"Experts have told us that mobile phones are being eavesdropped on more and more, even when they are switched off," Alexandra Boy, spokeswoman for Essen-based speciality chemicals maker Evonik, told AFP.

"The measure applies mostly when sensitive issues are being discussed, for the most part in research and development," she said, confirming a report in business weekly Wirtschaftswoche.

Biscuit tins have a so-called Farraday cage effect, she said, blocking out and therefore preventing people from hacking into mobile phones, not only for calls but also to get hold of emails.

The firm, with 34,000 employees and sales of 13 billion euros ($18.5 billion), is not alone in wanting to defend itself against what experts warn are increasingly sophisticated methods of .

This month the German government opened a new national centre in Bonn to coordinate efforts not only to protect firms from espionage but also state infrastructure from cyberattacks.

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finitesolutions
1 / 5 (2) Jun 27, 2011
The german managers are busy how to scoop all the euros from EU.
paulthebassguy
2 / 5 (12) Jun 27, 2011
This sounds like something my grandparents would do.
Recovering_Human
not rated yet Jun 28, 2011
"even when they are switched off"

Why don't their phones actually turn OFF when turned "off?" What am I missing?

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