Experts warn epic weather ravaging US could worsen

Jun 29, 2011 by Mira Oberman
Smoke rises around the Lee Valley Recreational area in the Apache National Forest during back burn operations as the Wallow Fire continues to burn in Big Lake, Arizona on June 12. Epic floods, massive wildfires, drought and the deadliest tornado season in 60 years are ravaging the United States, with scientists warning that climate change will bring even more extreme weather.

Epic floods, massive wildfires, drought and the deadliest tornado season in 60 years are ravaging the United States, with scientists warning that climate change will bring even more extreme weather.

The human and economic toll over just the past few months has been staggering: hundreds of people have died, and thousands of homes and millions of acres have been lost at a cost estimated at more than $20 billion.

And the has not even entered peak .

"This spring was one of the most extreme springs that we've seen in the last century since we've had good records," said Deke Arndt, chief of climate monitoring for the (NOAA).

While it's not possible to tie a specific or pattern to , Arndt said this spring's extreme weather is in line with what is forecast for the future.

"In general, but not everywhere, it is expected that the wetter places will get wetter and the drier places will tend to see more prolonged dry periods," he told AFP.

Epic floods, massive wildfires, drought and the deadliest tornado season in 60 years are ravaging the United States, with scientists warning that climate change will bring even more extreme weather.

"We are seeing an increase in the amount (of rain and snow) that comes at once, and the ramifications are that it's a lot more water to deal with at a time, so you see things like flooding."

More than 6.8 million acres in the central United States have been swamped after record spring rainfall overwhelmed rivers already swollen from the melting of a heavy pack.

Some levees burst under the pressure as the mighty swelled to more than three miles (nearly five kilometers) in width. Others were intentionally breached in order to ease pressure and protect cities downstream.

The latest flooding along the Missouri River has forced mass evacuations and threatened to inundate two in Nebraska.

Meanwhile, the southern United States is dealing with one of the most extreme droughts since the dust bowl of the 1930s, and the dry conditions have led to massive and uncontrollable wildfires.

More than 4.7 million acres have been burned in some 32,000 separate fires so far this year, which is more than twice the annual average over the past decade, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

Texas, Arizona and New Mexico have lost the most land, and one fire even spread to the grounds of the top US nuclear research lab on Monday.

Storm clouds are seen over Miami in Florida in 2010. Epic floods, massive wildfires, drought and the deadliest tornado season in 60 years are ravaging the United States, with scientists warning that climate change will bring even more extreme weather.

As with the plants in Nebraska, officials said the nuclear material stored inside is safe and that no contaminants have been released.

While most people have been able to escape the slow-moving floodwaters and wildfires unharmed, the spring's violent storms have unleashed scenes of apocalyptic destruction.

Tornadoes have killed 542 people so far this year, making 2011 the deadliest tornado season since 1936 and the fourth worst on record, according to the National Weather Service.

Two bad days accounted for nearly all the deaths: an outbreak of dozens of tornadoes that killed 314 people in five southern states on April 27, and a nearly mile-wide twister that cut a six-mile (nearly 10 kilometer) swath of destruction through Joplin, Missouri on May 22, killing 146 people.

Climate change could bring less tornadoes, because while a warmer atmosphere will absorb more precipitation, causing more storms, it could also reduce the wind shear that builds storm intensity when cold and warm fronts collide.

A fire fighter sprays foam on a hotspot that flared up as he works on containing a brush fire in West Dade, Florida on June 10. Epic floods, massive wildfires, drought and the deadliest tornado season in 60 years are ravaging the United States, with scientists warning that climate change will bring even more extreme weather.

However, the intensity of future droughts, heat waves, storms and floods is expected to rise drastically if greenhouse gas emissions don't stabilize soon, said Michael Mann, a scientist at Penn State University.

"Even a couple degree warming can make a 100-year event a three-year event," Mann, the head of the university's earth systems science center, told AFP.

"It has to do with the tail of the bell curve. When you move the bell curve, that area changes dramatically."

More is expected in the coming months, said Jon Gottschalck, head of forecast operations at NOAA's climate prediction center.

"We're expecting warmer than normal conditions to continue across much of the south. The drought is probably going to continue in many areas," he said.

"We also expect wetter than normal conditions to continue for the next season or two in the northern Rockies...and an active hurricane season."

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omatumr
1.3 / 5 (23) Jun 29, 2011
The sad truth is that mankind is powerless over the violently unstable remains of the supernova that gave birth to the solar system five billion (5 Gyr) ago.

I regret that this fact annoys so many of those promoting the idea that Earth's heat source is a giant, stable hydrogen-fusion reactor (the Standard Solar Model).

For a historical review of the data see:

"Why the Model of a Hydrogen-Filled Sun Is Obsolete" (2002)
http://arxiv.org/...410569v1

The latest paper on this subject is here:

"Neutron Repulsion", The
APEIRON Journal, in press, 19 pages (2011)

http://arxiv.org/...2.1499v1

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
ryggesogn2
2 / 5 (20) Jun 29, 2011
Why should Mann be trusted?
jscroft
3.3 / 5 (7) Jun 29, 2011
Don't know. Never met the guy.
lengould100
4.3 / 5 (11) Jun 29, 2011
Why should anyone else be trusted any more than Mann? Either accept verifiable expertise or live in ignorance.
sstritt
3 / 5 (7) Jun 29, 2011
Tornadoes have killed 542 people so far this year, making 2011 the deadliest tornado season since 1936 and the fourth worst on record, according to the National Weather Service.

The death toll from these two years are so high because of a few particularly bad storms which hit highly populous areas. This year's Joplin Mo., and Tuscaloosa/ Birmingham Al.; 1936 outbreak included a 2 day stormtrack which spawned the Tupelo Ms. storm and the Gainesville, Ga. storm EACH of which killed more than 200 .
Also see: "No link between tornadoes and climate change: US"
posted May 23 on this site. http://wwwDOTphys...ate.html
ryggesogn2
2.1 / 5 (22) Jun 29, 2011
Why should anyone else be trusted any more than Mann? Either accept verifiable expertise or live in ignorance.

The National Academy of Science slapped Mann's wrist for his his fraudulent hockey stick data.
But Mann is an AGW high priest so the ends justify the means.

In 1936, radar did not exist. How many tornadoes were not tracked or observed?
ryggesogn2
1.5 / 5 (17) Jun 29, 2011
What does Mann have to hide?

http://www.atinst...inia-to/
omatumr
1.7 / 5 (18) Jun 29, 2011
The unvarnished facts - revealed by scientific studies - are not reassuring to the inflated egos of scientists and politicians.

The Suns violently unstable neutron core gave birth to the Solar System five billion years ago, including the material that comprises us and planet Earth [1-3].

Continued emissions from the solar core bath us with photons, particles and fields (sunlight, heat and energy) that sustains us as intelligent, living creatures.

Despite all his knowledge and illusion of power and self-importance, mankind is totally dependent on the forces of Nature.

I hope to be able to communicate that unpalatable truth in the summary of my research career, A Journey to the Core of the Sun.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel

1. Nature 262, 28 (1976)

www.nature.com/na...8a0.html

2. Science 195, 208 (1977)

www.omatumr.com/a...enon.pdf

3. Nature 277, 615 (1979)

www.nature.com/na...5a0.html
sstritt
3.1 / 5 (13) Jun 29, 2011
"A new peer-reviewed research paper by Dr. Ryan Maue, a meteorologist from Florida State University, indicates that, during the past 6-years since Hurricane Katrina, global tropical cyclone frequency and energy have decreased dramatically, and are currently at near-historical record lows. According to Dr. Maues research, only 69 tropical storms were observed globally during 2010, the fewest in almost 40-years of reliable records.

Furthermore, when each storm's intensity and duration were taken into account, the total global tropical cyclone accumulated energy (ACE) was found to have fallen by half to the lowest level since 1977."

Continue reading on Examiner.com Hurricanes are fewer, and less intense, according to new research - Louisville Public Policy | Examiner.com http://www.examin...QgAw7Xcl
GSwift7
3.1 / 5 (9) Jun 29, 2011
From the most recent NOAA report:

Nationally, May 2011 ranked as the 25th coolest and 27th wettest May in the 1895-2011 record.


That doesn't seem extraordinarily catastrophic to me. That's actually kinda in the middle, and probably places it in the 80th percentile range. Changes in both our ability to observe weather in remote areas, and our classification of what qualifies as a severe weather event, have combined to cause the appearance of an increase in said events. We see many more small tornados and tropical storms than we once were capable of seeing. Due to the public safety issue, NCDC standards of clasification have gotten looser too. In the interest of erring on safe side, smaller events are now tagged and warnings are issued for events that previously would not have triggered warnings.

By the way, water management people were asking why the corps of engineers weren't making room for melt water in reservoirs several months ago. Waiting for more on that story.
kaasinees
1.3 / 5 (7) Jun 29, 2011
From the most recent NOAA report:

Nationally, May 2011 ranked as the 25th coolest and 27th wettest May in the 1895-2011 record.

That is actually very concerning and supports this article.
By the way, water management people were asking why the corps of engineers weren't making room for melt water in reservoirs several months ago. Waiting for more on that story.

I dont know what melt water is.. but catching rainfall and treating it with microbes or reversed osmosis, why not?
GSwift7
2 / 5 (8) Jun 29, 2011
I dont know what melt water is..


water from when snow melts in the Spring. Duh.

That is actually very concerning and supports this article.


26th place out of 116 is nearly average. 58th place would be exactly average. I hardly see how being so close to average is any concerne. Don't be a fool.

This spring was one of the most extreme springs that we've seen in the last century since we've had good records


The official NOAA climate report does not support his opinion.
kaasinees
1 / 5 (4) Jun 29, 2011
I dont know what melt water is..


water from when snow melts in the Spring. Duh.


Duh? Its called molten snow... melt water is like steam or something, doesnt make sense ;)

26th place out of 116 is nearly average. 58th place would be exactly average. I hardly see how being so close to average is any concerne. Don't be a fool.

So how do the other days look like?
Pkunk_
2.1 / 5 (10) Jun 29, 2011
Climate change could bring less tornadoes, because while a warmer atmosphere will absorb more precipitation, causing more storms, it could also reduce the wind shear that builds storm intensity when cold and warm fronts collide.


When the proponents of failed theory starts using words like 'could' twice in a sentence you know that the end to thier fraud is near.

The freak weather has been explained to a La Nana and a 100 other reasons , but Piers Corbyn @ http://climaterea...?id=7759 seems to have done an excellent job actually forecasting it weeks/months before it actually happened.
Shaffer
1.8 / 5 (5) Jun 29, 2011
The solar activity peaked 1936, and we are coming into a higher solar activity period now as well. More energy from the sun = more energy in the atmosphere...right?

I don't want to start sounding like omatumr, but I think this is at least playing into the climate situation a little bit.

I truly believe this is cyclical...
GSwift7
2.6 / 5 (7) Jun 29, 2011
Duh? Its called molten snow... melt water is like steam or something, doesnt make sense ;)


oh, so you're joking here I guess. Meltwater is a real term though: http://en.wikiped...eltwater

So how do the other days look like?


The NOAA figures represent the weather data for the months of march, april and may for the past 116 years (the season of Spring), not a single day. I did not select that date range. That is simply the date range NOAA/NCDC covered in this month's State of the Climate Report.

Oh, and here's the story about the Corps of Engineers failing to properly manage reservoir levels back in February, which has led to the current flooding. Governor Roy Blunt of Missouri is pressing for action and investigation.

http://www.americ...and.html

That story is far from over.
Moebius
2.6 / 5 (10) Jun 29, 2011
I've been telling people for years the weather is going crazy and it's going to get worse. I am saying now it's going to get crazier and it's going to get worse, much worse. You ain't seen nothin yet and we are causing it.
GSwift7
3.2 / 5 (11) Jun 29, 2011
You ain't seen nothin yet and we are causing it.


The most recent official statement from NOAA does not support your opinion:

http://www.climat...outbreak

here's a quote:

The number of smaller tornadoes seems to have increased; the number of large tornadoes has not. Between better technologyradars, satellites, the internetand greater public awareness, its likely that the increase is due to more reports, not more tornadoes.


and:

The CSI team compiled a record of atmospheric instability over the Gulf of Mexico and the southern United States from 1979-2010 and saw no sign of a long-term change.


and:

the CSI team analyzed daily wind shear from 1979-2010. The results showed no trend, only year-to-year variability.


and:

A change in the mean climate properties... relevant to severe storms has thus not been detected for April.. during last 30 yrs
(cut down for space)
frenchie
3.2 / 5 (5) Jun 29, 2011
@Shaffer - just wanted to address your post. There is an article here on physorg about how the sun is actually not going to go into a period of high intensity and may actually go into a minimum.
see: http://www.physor...lar.html

@ Punk - First it's call El Nino & La Nina (not nana).
http://www.physor...ada.html

Finally Corbyn's predictions are based on what is called "The Solar Weather Technique."[7] The technique "combines statistical analysis of over a century of historical weather patterns with clues derived from solar observations."[1] He considers past weather patterns and solar observations and sun-earth magnetic connectivity. Conventional meteorology claims that such influences cause minimal impact on the Earth's atmosphere.[8] Corbyn has declined to publish the details of his method.

Link: http://en.wikiped...s_Corbyn

Sound like omatur has competition !!!

Either way your post is garbage
sstritt
1.8 / 5 (5) Jun 29, 2011
@ Punk - First it's call El Nino & La Nina (not nana).

I think he's referring to the newly coined term "La Nada" http://www.physor...ada.html
Shaffer
5 / 5 (1) Jun 29, 2011
@Shaffer - just wanted to address your post. There is an article here on physorg about how the sun is actually not going to go into a period of high intensity and may actually go into a minimum.
see: http://www.physor...lar.html


Yeah, I know, but it's higher than it has been in the past few years...Solar activity was REALLY low, causing a dryer atmosphere and colder winters the past few years....

It was just a thought...I'm probably completely wrong... ;)
Doc_aymz
1 / 5 (1) Jun 29, 2011
could this be a self solving problem? No more oil, no more CO2. Problem solved.
omatumr
1.3 / 5 (13) Jun 29, 2011
I've been telling people for years the weather is going crazy and it's going to get worse. I am saying now it's going to get crazier and it's going to get worse, much worse. You ain't seen nothin yet and we are causing it.


Two unpalatable, but inescapable conclusions, from decades of careful, space-age measurements on material from various parts of the solar system, including the Sun, comets, meteorites and planets:

1. "A highly energetic, compact neutron star at the core of the Sun gave birth to the entire Solar System, including all of the material that comprises us, and now bathes us with fields, photons and particles (sunlight, heat and energy) that sustains us as intelligent, living creatures."

2. "Mankind is totally powerless over the violently unstable pulsar at the core of the Sun."

These conclusions do not support our unstated but widely held assumption of self-importance, but they seem inescapable.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel

jlantrip
4.6 / 5 (8) Jun 29, 2011

Two unpalatable, but inescapable conclusions, from decades of careful, space-age measurements on material from various parts of the solar system, including the Sun, comets, meteorites and planets:

1. "A highly energetic, compact neutron star at the core of the Sun gave birth to the entire Solar System, including all of the material that comprises us, and now bathes us with fields, photons and particles (sunlight, heat and energy) that sustains us as intelligent, living creatures."

2. "Mankind is totally powerless over the violently unstable pulsar at the core of the Sun."

The Pulsar at the core of the sun? What in the world are you talking about, pulsars are highly magnetized, rotating neutron stars, our sun is a very typical mid sized star that is very stable compared to a pulsar which would not support life as we know it. Good luck getting that published.
TheMuskyBuck
1.4 / 5 (8) Jun 29, 2011
Hi Oliver,

I wanted to say thanks for posting all the links available to your work and research.

I find your work extremely exciting and interesting and often consider the implications of a neutron star at our centre of our solar system.

In any case, I believe it's deserved to say something positive in light of the all too familiar activity of the peers here; sadly a group that hasn't changed at all since the first hypothesis caused the first high priests to scream blasphemy.
omatumr
1.3 / 5 (10) Jun 29, 2011
Hi Oliver,

I wanted to say thanks for posting all the links available to your work and research.


Thanks for your kindness.

I started research to understand the origin of the Earth and its elements about 51 years ago (~May 1960), as an arrogant atheist seeking to rewrite the Biblical story of Genesis.

The conclusions to this journey were as distasteful to me as to most scientists, politicians, and strong-willed people: I am powerless over Nature.

The Pulsar at the core of the sun? What in the world are you talking about, pulsars are highly magnetized, rotating neutron stars, our sun is a very typical mid sized star that is very stable compared to a pulsar which would not support life as we know it. Good luck getting that published.


That has been published many times since 2000. It may have implications for cosmology.

"Is the Universe Expanding?" [The Journal of Cosmology 13, 4187-4190 (2011)]

http://journalofc...102.html
MarkyMark
3 / 5 (4) Jun 30, 2011
Hi Oliver,

I wanted to say thanks for posting all the links available to your work and research.

I find your work extremely exciting and interesting and often consider the implications of a neutron star at our centre of our solar system.

In any case, I believe it's deserved to say something positive in light of the all too familiar activity of the peers here; sadly a group that hasn't changed at all since the first hypothesis caused the first high priests to scream blasphemy.

Heh i see 'Oliver' has resorted to using alt accounts to support his crazy ideas concerning the sun and soon probably supporting his whacky childcare methods too, the paedo!!
bishop
1.7 / 5 (3) Jun 30, 2011
US Lobbyists and others won the war on this one, with one tiny change in formulation and naming.

Having named "Global Warming" everything that is going on at the moment is far less accurate than "Climate Disruption".

And everyone from the politician to the farmer can now say that nothing is happening ("hey, look at the window there is 1 meter of snow! Global warning is a scam then?!")

Climate change IS NOT about hot weather in summer and cooler temperature in winter BUT about extreme weather events/fluctuation (more often and catastrophic ones) ...

Now, it's payback time ... unfortunately worldwide ...
omatumr
1.4 / 5 (9) Jun 30, 2011
And everyone from the politician to the farmer can now say that nothing is happening ("hey, look at the window there is 1 meter of snow! Global warning is a scam then?!")


Right. A Scam. Earth's atmosphere is NOT a heat source.

Look at heat flow in the Earth and the Sun:

a.) Sun: Heat from its Pulsar Core => Mantle => Solar Atmosphere

b.) Earth: Heat from Sun => Atmosphere/Oceans => Mantle => Earth's Core

Spending national resources to fight imaginary heat from the atmosphere (AGW) leads to poverty, borrowing, and eventually to national bankruptcy.

A scam that led once fiercely independent nations like Greece into bankruptcy and debt to the Word Bank (IMF, International Monetary Fund).

A coincidence?

GSwift7
2.9 / 5 (7) Jun 30, 2011
A scam that led once fiercely independent nations like Greece into bankruptcy and debt to the Word Bank


Nah, Greece just has too many government employees and people who get money for nothing. The Greeks seem to think that they have a right to own cars, houses, microwave ovens, shoes, etc. even if they don't have jobs to pay for them. The insane belief that exists in every industrialized country today, that people are entitled to get expensive MRI scans, organ transplants, costly long term drug treatments, etc. even though they can't afford them, is unsustainable. It's sad, but true, that only wealthy people can really afford the best in life. Someone like a school administrator should not live in a quarter million dollar house or drive a luxury SUV. We have all collectively lost our freaking minds over the past 50 years. Sorry Oliver, but it's the Baby Boomers' fault.
ryggesogn2
1.5 / 5 (8) Jun 30, 2011
We have all collectively lost our freaking minds over the past 50 years.

Speak for yourself.
GSwift7
3.3 / 5 (8) Jun 30, 2011
Speak for yourself.


Sorry, but the collective and all-inclusive "us" includes you too. You use the schools, roads, telephones, police, firefighters, military, courts, water, electricity, post office, etc, etc, etc... just like everyone else. If you were king for a day, I'm sure you would do things differently, but that doesn't make you a non-consumer of the services as they stand. I'll bet that if you had a car accident, you would not turn down a helicopter ride to a hospital. Lots of people get student loans that they can't pay back. If you have ever gone to a public park or museum, then you are guilty as well. Ever visit the NASA or NOAA web sites? Those aren't free you know.
omatumr
1.9 / 5 (9) Jun 30, 2011
We have all collectively lost our freaking minds over the past 50 years.


Right. It was a little over 50 years ago when

Eisenhower warned us of danger from a Federal "Scientific-Technological Elite" in his farewell address on 17 Jan 1961:

Read his speech here:
http://mcadams.po.../ike.htm

Or hear the key part here:
http://www.youtub...ld5PR4ts

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
GSwift7
2 / 5 (4) Jun 30, 2011
Yeah, he warned us about it, but this quote is about when it really started to happen:

and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard


...and regardless of the cost, whether we can afford it or not.
omatumr
2.3 / 5 (6) Jun 30, 2011
You describe the path to serfdom.
GSwift7
2.7 / 5 (7) Jun 30, 2011
I should be clear that it's not just an American problem though.

The whole world has gone agency crazy. Here in the US, for example, we have the FBI, NSA, CIA, DHS, INS, Treasury, ATF, Border Patrol, Coastguard, State Police, Sheriff's dept, City Police, National Park Rangers, State Park Rangers, etc., etc. Look at all the duplication of administrative functions accross all those essentially similar agencies. The school systems are the same, as well as social services, and government science organizations. Look how many seperate branches there are just in NASA, and they keep adding new agencies. NOAA just created a climate agency, for example.

I don't think the average person even has a clue how big the beauracracy really is. The overhead of all the buildings and administration is staggering.

...And they talk about cutting medicaid or social security payments to save the budget. Let's create a new agency to accomplish that. lol.
GSwift7
2.3 / 5 (6) Jun 30, 2011
The Tea Party is getting close to going in the right direction, but not quite there yet. Their goals are not quite what they need to be yet. High taxes are a symptom of the real problem, so reducing taxes won't cure the disease. One of these days though, things will snap and somebody is going to have to clean house and get rid of all these agencies we don't really need. For a place like Greece, they need to do it really fast which is going to hurt. We still have time here, so if we started now, we could slowly consolidate and eliminate agencies over time. The effects on jobs could be minimized. But, we all know that we aren't going to start doing that until we get to the point where Greece is now. Watch California over the next 5 to 10 years and we should see an example of what is coming here in the US in the next 20-30 years at the Federal level.
omatumr
1.8 / 5 (5) Jun 30, 2011
I should be clear that it's not just an American problem though.


Should we solve the American problem before starting our campaign to save the world?

Could we borrow money from the IMF (International Monetary Fund) or World Bank to ease the pain of getting our financial house in order?

Greece and many other countries did that. Major cities all around the globe did that.

Can we?
kaasinees
1.7 / 5 (6) Jun 30, 2011
gswift7:
The NOAA figures represent the weather data for the months of march, april and may for the past 116 years (the season of Spring), not a single day.


Yet you only picked out one day as an argument that the article is wrong.
sstritt
1 / 5 (5) Jun 30, 2011
Could we borrow money from the IMF (International Monetary Fund) or World Bank to ease the pain of getting our financial house in order?

We'll have to appeal to a higher authority, the Intergalactic Monetary Fund, for a loan of $10 quintillion of space cash.
ryggesogn2
2 / 5 (8) Jun 30, 2011
Speak for yourself.


Sorry, but the collective and all-inclusive "us" includes you too. You use the schools, roads, telephones, police, firefighters, military, courts, water, electricity, post office, etc, etc, etc... just like everyone else. If you were king for a day, I'm sure you would do things differently, but that doesn't make you a non-consumer of the services as they stand. I'll bet that if you had a car accident, you would not turn down a helicopter ride to a hospital. Lots of people get student loans that they can't pay back. If you have ever gone to a public park or museum, then you are guilty as well. Ever visit the NASA or NOAA web sites? Those aren't free you know.

I pay taxes. I paid back my student loans. My insurance covers emergency medical care. Speak for yourself.
Using parks and museums I have been forced to pay for makes me guilty of what?
TheMuskyBuck
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 30, 2011
Hi Oliver,

I wanted to say thanks for posting all the links available to your work and research.

I find your work extremely exciting and interesting and often consider the implications of a neutron star at our centre of our solar system.

In any case, I believe it's deserved to say something positive in light of the all too familiar activity of the peers here; sadly a group that hasn't changed at all since the first hypothesis caused the first high priests to scream blasphemy.

Heh i see 'Oliver' has resorted to using alt accounts to support his crazy ideas concerning the sun and soon probably supporting his whacky childcare methods too, the paedo!!


I can assure you I am no fake human. Along with not being a fake, I am a seasoned broadcaster/writer/entrepreneur that loves physics, astronomy and many other fields but never had the mathematical prowess to entirely divulge myself in these.

Just a tid bit about me, a real person who also enjoys Oliver's work.
GSwift7
2 / 5 (4) Jun 30, 2011
Yet you only picked out one day as an argument that the article is wrong


No, I did not pick a single day. You are not understanding what I wrote. I have no idea what you are talking about. At no point in any of my posts did I reference a single day.

I pay taxes. I paid back my student loans. My insurance covers emergency medical care. Speak for yourself.
Using parks and museums I have been forced to pay for makes me guilty of what


guilty of being part of our society, rather than apart from it. BTW, my rating to you was the 5/5 on that one, just so you know. My point is not that you are a bad person, or me either. However, we both are being "protected" by the EPA, FDA, NCDC, CDC, etc., whether we want it or not. We've discussed this before. I am not opposed to governance to the degree you are, but I do believe HD Thoreau was right when he said that the government which governs least governs best. We don't need a Wipe Your Butt For You Beaurau for everything.
GSwift7
1 / 5 (2) Jun 30, 2011
Yet you only picked out one day as an argument that the article is wrong


I am trying to keep in mind that English is not your native language. That's probably the issue here. I believe this post is what you are having trouble with?

26th place out of 116 is nearly average. 58th place would be exactly average


The 26th is not a date. The NOAA report said that the month of May was the 25th coolest and 27th wettest May in 116 years of statistics for the month of May. I combined the 25 and 27 into 26 to save space. I gave a quote directly from the NOAA report in one of my posts way up at the top.

Now do you understand my point? 26 out of 116 is not extreme. There have been 24 times in 116 years when the month of May was colder than this year's May temps. The other way they could have said it, is that May 2011 was the 91st warmest May in 116 years. That doesn't sound very alarming though.
rubberman
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 30, 2011
Wow kids! Everybody is so stressed out. Look on the bright side. Depending on your age either yourselves or your children will be alive during a time in which there is an enormous fundamental shift in the way we live our lives as a global population. Whether it be a collection of anthropogenic issues that combine together and react like throwing a ball of magnesium into a bucket of water....or Olivers angry neutron star issues...change will be forced upon us all. Until then I will happily contribute to this unsustainable lifestyle I have inadvertantly helped create. Cheers!
ryggesogn2
1.6 / 5 (7) Jun 30, 2011
I am not opposed to governance to the degree you are, but I do believe HD Thoreau was right when he said that the government which governs least governs best. We don't need a Wipe Your Butt For You Beaurau for everything.

If you want the socialist ship of state to turn to starboard, you must put the rudder hard starboard and reverse port screws.
You sound satisfied to keep rudder amidships. That's what the socialists count on.
GSwift7
1 / 5 (2) Jun 30, 2011
Kaasinees:

One more note about the statistics for May.

Since you are worried about the month of May being extreme, we really aren't talking about where it ranks from 0 to 116. We should actually be looking at only the magnitude of the anomaly regardless of whether it is positive or negative, which assuming a normal distribution, would place it somewhere around 50 out of 116 years. In a normal bell curve, that makes it a very average year, near the 70th percentile range, or about 1 sigma standard deviation.
GSwift7
1 / 5 (1) Jun 30, 2011
You sound satisfied to keep rudder amidships. That's what the socialists count on.


Huh? Did you even read my posts? I'm saying we should totally phase out whole agencies. That's hardly smooth sailing.
ryggesogn2
1.8 / 5 (5) Jun 30, 2011
You sound satisfied to keep rudder amidships. That's what the socialists count on.


Huh? Did you even read my posts? I'm saying we should totally phase out whole agencies. That's hardly smooth sailing.

How do you plan to do that?
rubberman
1 / 5 (3) Jun 30, 2011
We could go REALLY hard core and phase out the monetary system completely......work off of a "reward for value to society" type system in which all resources are tightly guarded by the military and only used when required for humanitarian reasons. The military and police become elected officials and politicians can work along side people of similar character....could be alot of work amalgamating parliament and penetentiaries but I think under this new system we would all be happier.
sstritt
3.3 / 5 (7) Jun 30, 2011
We could go REALLY hard core and phase out the monetary system completely......work off of a "reward for value to society" type system in which all resources are tightly guarded by the military and only used when required for humanitarian reasons. The military and police become elected officials and politicians can work along side people of similar character....could be alot of work amalgamating parliament and penetentiaries but I think under this new system we would all be happier.

Already been tried. I believe they called it the USSR. Of all the adjectives ever used to describe it, I don't think "happy" made the top ten.
moebiex
not rated yet Jun 30, 2011
Taking precautions only costs a bit of money, a completely human construct and therefore easily and endelessly replaceable. Negligence on the other may lead to the extinction of our civilization, not will but may, and if it turns out we could have saved a lot of grief by moving sooner rather than later, are the naysayers going to apologize or as I suspect is more likely attack those who did not do enough? Grownups do what they can when they can to short circuit the likelyhood of seeing worse outcomes- why can't we?
ryggesogn2
1.4 / 5 (9) Jun 30, 2011
Grownups do what they can when they can to short circuit the likelyhood of seeing worse outcomes-

Too bad AGWites don't have the same zeal for the trillions in unfunded govt mandates.
kaasinees
2.5 / 5 (8) Jun 30, 2011
From the most recent NOAA report:

Nationally, May 2011 ranked as the 25th coolest and 27th wettest May in the 1895-2011 record.


That doesn't seem extraordinarily catastrophic to me.

Lets say the avg temp of year 2343 is 50 degrees, max 100 and min 0 degrees. And we pick month X where avg temp was 40 degrees, saying that weather has been normal.

That is your argumentation anyway.

On another note, we are starting to seee tornados in the Netherlands, one decent tornado and a large part of our country will be wiped away.

@omatumor, dyckson2, getting tired of your posts... reporting them all.
kaasinees
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 30, 2011
Here is a video of nearly forming a tornado.

http://www.youtub...Vc7LU5oY


As far as i know that is not normal in our country. Also we havent seen snow for years. Also the seasons seems to be messed up. Plus one day it was ~20 degrees and the next day it was 34 degrees. Plus rain fall has increased alot.

In other parts of the world they have seen snow last year while generations have never seen snow fall there. If you do not agree the weather is messed up you are very blind of the world.
kaasinees
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 30, 2011
here are some more videos of that same day, same storm.

http://www.youtub...0Z9oqqb8
http://www.youtub...rXOf_m4g


in the other video, if you pay attention to the cell instead of the weak funnel you would see it almost went into rotation.

we do have storms around this time because of season transition into summer, but this was not a normal storm.
GSwift7
3 / 5 (2) Jul 01, 2011
How do you plan to do that?


That's the trillion dollar question that's being asked in Washington right now. As Obama once said; There's more than one way to skin a cat. You could use blunt force and decommission an unwanted agancy by Senate action. That's probalby the worst way, though it would be fast. The way everyone seems to want is through budget reductions, but I don't think that's the best way either. There's a problem with lots of government programs because they tend to spread stuff out diffent States. They need to stop that. There's no reason that NASA needs offices in NY, DE, FL, TX, NM, CA, AL, etc. They could save a ton of money by relocating some of those facilities and consolidating them with other locations. The military did something similar over the past 20 years with base consolidation. Shaw Airforce base, in Sumter SC, is currently becoming a combined Airforce/Army base, for example. It cuts down on lots of expenses in terms of base facilities.
GSwift7
3 / 5 (2) Jul 01, 2011
Grownups do what they can when they can to short circuit the likelyhood of seeing worse outcomes- why can't we?


You have to look at the whole list of pro's and con's to understand. For the sake of clear debate, we'll assume that AGW is certain and the concequences will be bad in 100 years or less. That isn't the only factor though. Industrialization of third world countries has many benefits, such as reduced poverty, hunger, war, disease. Providing people with affordable energy might have a great enough positive effect to make the negative effects worthwhile. Then it comes down to a value judgement. Are people more important than polar bears, for example? That's an absurd way to state the question, I know, but it's illustrative of my point. How about this one: The increased standard of living in China and India is leading to lower birth rates there. The faster that happens, the better. Double edged sword.
GSwift7
3 / 5 (2) Jul 01, 2011
In other parts of the world they have seen snow last year while generations have never seen snow fall there. If you do not agree the weather is messed up you are very blind of the world


It has gotten warmer, everyone knows that, but all the experts say that warmer weather is not causing more extreme weather on average. Unusual events like the ones you are talking about have always happened. There's an unusual weather event somewhere in the world every day, and it's been that way forever, even before humans. That's what the experts are trying to tell you. In fact, a tropical storm expert from University of Miami just released a paper showing that tropical storm intensity, frequency, durration have decreased with global warming to historical lows. The reason you hear so much more about it lately is just due to better communication (internet) and better detection systems (satellites). That's what the experts from (pro-agw) NOAA are saying.
MarkyMark
5 / 5 (2) Jul 01, 2011
We could go REALLY hard core and phase out the monetary system completely......work off of a "reward for value to society" type system in which all resources are tightly guarded by the military and only used when required for humanitarian reasons. The military and police become elected officials and politicians can work along side people of similar character....could be alot of work amalgamating parliament and penetentiaries but I think under this new system we would all be happier.

Already been tried. I believe they called it the USSR. Of all the adjectives ever used to describe it, I don't think "happy" made the top ten.

Actually happy was in the top three. Of course when people voted on there adjective to describe it the local USSR political officer was looking over there shoulders at the time, to help them make there free vote ;(
GSwift7
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 01, 2011
Actually happy was in the top three. Of course when people voted on there adjective to describe it the local USSR political officer was looking over there shoulders at the time, to help them make there free vote ;(


There's a Russian comedian that says something like "In Russia we only work 3 days a week in office" pause "so we can work 4 days in factory"
sstritt
3 / 5 (4) Jul 01, 2011
Actually happy was in the top three. Of course when people voted on there adjective to describe it the local USSR political officer was looking over there shoulders at the time, to help them make there free vote ;(


There's a Russian comedian that says something like "In Russia we only work 3 days a week in office" pause "so we can work 4 days in factory"

Another old Russian joke was: "We pretend to work and they pretend to pay us."
_nigmatic10
5 / 5 (1) Jul 03, 2011
This is an alarmist article that is another sad example of some of the junk that makes its way on to this site. The extreme weather seen this year were directly attributed to the strange arctic jet stream that pushed record amounts of cold air further south than normal. As to why it happened is unclear and attributed to El Nino, sea temperatures, and solar activities, among other things.
GSwift7
3 / 5 (2) Jul 05, 2011
The extreme weather seen this year were directly attributed to the strange arctic jet stream that pushed record amounts of cold air further south than normal. As to why it happened is unclear


Actually, if you take a look at the PDO maps I linked to above, the modified jet stream is quite well documented and has been observed before. It is a normal part of the cycles of ocean surface temperatures and sea level air pressure. With the northern Pacific and northern Atlantic both changing phase right now, we could also see an end to the massive amounts of pack ice that have been flowing out of the Arctic in the past few years. The next two decades will be a great windfall (excuse the punn) for observational study, especially with all of our new space-based observatories, like the A-Train satellites.

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