Elpida begins sample shipments of DDR3 SDRAM (x32) based on TSV stacking technology

Jun 28, 2011

Elpida Memory today announced that it has begun sample shipments of the industry's first DDR3 SDRAM (x32-bit I/O configuration) made using TSV (Through Silicon Via) stacking technology. The sample is a low-power 8-gigabit (1-gigabyte) DDR3 SDRAM assembled in a single package that consists of four 2-gigabit DDR3 SDRAMs fitted to a single interface chip using TSV.

TSV is three-dimensional stack , which involves stacking together multiple chips vertically through with metal-filled via holes in the SI die. Compared with the existing connection method of wire bonding multiple chips, TSV greatly reduces the length of wires in the semiconductor design to enable faster speeds, lower power consumption, smaller package size and other important chip function advantages.

Elpida began developing TSV, now recognized as a key next-generation chip technology, in 2004 based on a grant program hosted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), a research endeavor founded by the Japanese government. Since then Elpida has continued to develop TSV technology. In 2009 it successfully developed the industry's first TSV DRAM based on stacking together eight 1-gigabit DDR3 SDRAMs.

In the case of notebook PCs, Elpida believes that trial use of its 8-gigabit TSV DRAM samples will demonstrate that compared with systems that use SO-DIMM (Small-outline DIMM), operating power can be reduced by 20% and by 50%. Also, the chip mounting area can be reduced by 70%, the chip height can be decreased and the DIMM socket can be eliminated. The new TSV DRAM will be presented as an eco-friendly DRAM that can contribute greater energy savings and enable thin , tablet PCs and other mobile computing products experiencing rapid market growth to become even smaller, thinner and lighter.

Explore further: New oscillator for low-power implantable transcievers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Elpida Completes Development of 50nm Process DDR3 SDRAM

Nov 26, 2008

Elpida Memory, Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced that it has completed development of a 50nm process DDR3 SDRAM. The new DRAM product features the lowest power consumption ...

Elpida develops industry's first 25nm process DRAM

May 02, 2011

Elpida Memory, Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced it had developed a 2-gigabit DDR3 SDRAM using an industry-leading 25nm process for memory manufacturing. Using the most ...

Recommended for you

Microsoft beefs up security protection in Windows 10

12 hours ago

What Microsoft users in business care deeply about—-a system architecture that supports efforts to get their work done efficiently; a work-centric menu to quickly access projects rather than weather readings ...

US official: Auto safety agency under review

Oct 24, 2014

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

Oct 24, 2014

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand ...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

Oct 24, 2014

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

Oct 24, 2014

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

Oct 24, 2014

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two ...

User comments : 0