Dell to create 150 jobs in modest boost to Irish economy

Jun 07, 2011

US computer giant Dell plans to open "cloud computing" research and support centres in Ireland, creating 150 jobs for the heavily indebted country, Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny announced on Tuesday.

Kenny said it was a "flagship investment" that demonstrated Dell's commitment to Ireland and was an important step in making the country a centre for cloud computing, which refers to the hosting online of shared resources and software.

"Ireland has become a focal point of global information technology development, and Dell's decision to locate new strategic resources in Ireland will help us to realise our ambition of becoming a centre of excellence for cloud," Kenny told reporters.

Dell will open a research centre in Dublin and a support centre in Limerick, southwest Ireland, as part of Dell's previously-announced plans to invest $1.0 billion (682 million euros) globally in new technology solutions and services.

The developments will involve the recruitment of 150 , IT architects, engineers and developers across both sites over the next two years.

Jeff Clarke, vice chairman of Dell's global operations and end user computing solutions, said the Irish investments are central to its strategy of establishing leadership in cloud computing.

, which first set up operations in Ireland in 1990, currently employs about 2,300 people across the country in sales and service operations, with about 1,000 in Limerick and 1,300 in Cherrywood, County Dublin.

The US giant cut 1,900 jobs at its Limerick plant in 2008 when it moved its production unit to Poland.

In a boost to Ireland, which recently needed a huge financial bailout, one of the fastest growing cloud computing companies, Marketo, announced in May that it would create 125 jobs in Dublin over the next three years.

Ireland's new government meanwhile plans to establish its own research centre in cloud computing, at a cost of 5.0 million euros.

A report by Microsoft predicted Ireland's industry could employ 8,600 people by 2014 and be worth 9.5 billion euros a year.

Explore further: Google unveils Android Pay in fresh challenge to Apple

Related Stories

Dell wins EU OK to get euro54.5 million Polish aid

Sep 23, 2009

(AP) -- Dell Inc. won EU approval Wednesday to receive a euro54.4 million ($80.4 million) subsidy from the Polish government to build a new plant there, replacing Ireland as the computer maker's new European manufacturing ...

Hewlett Packard to create 500 jobs in Ireland

Mar 10, 2009

US technology company Hewlett Packard is to create 500 jobs with an 18-million-euro (23-million-dollar) expansion of its global service desk operation in Leixlip, County Kildare southwest of Dublin, Prime ...

Recommended for you

VCs bet big on Silicon Valley biotech

4 hours ago

Companies searching for cures for cancer and testing treatments for crippling genetic diseases are capturing the interest of venture capitalists - and their money - more than at any time in the last seven years.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.