Crews fully contain 1 of 3 major Arizona wildfires

Jun 26, 2011 By BOB CHRISTIE , Associated Press
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists and volunteers use nets to remove two species of trout from a creek in the Chiricahua National Forest near Elfrida, Ariz., in this photo made on June 17, 2011. Unlike some major wildfires that inflict a serious human toll, perhaps the biggest impact from the largest wildfire in Arizona history will fall squarely on an ecosystem that’s home to numerous endangered species. (AP Photo/Humberto Rodriguez, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

(AP) -- One of three major wildfires burning in Arizona is now fully contained, and a second fire is nearly extinguished.

Officials said Sunday that the Horseshoe Two in southeastern Arizona is completely surrounded after burning more than 348 square miles.

The Monument fire near the southern Arizona city of Sierra Vista is 75 percent contained. Officials say the blaze is showing little activity as ground crews and finish putting it out. It has burned nearly 47 square miles and destroyed 57 homes, a five-unit apartment building and five businesses.

Meanwhile, the 845-square-mile Wallow fire continues to slowly chew though parts of the eastern Arizona, although it is 77 percent contained. That fire has destroyed 32 homes and four rental cabins and is the largest in Arizona's history.

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