Bright sparks among 'Asia's Nobel Prize' winners

June 7, 2011
Two scientists who are probing the brightest flashes in the universe were Tuesday named among the winners of the Shaw Prize, the $1 million award known as the Nobel Prize of the east.

Two scientists who are probing the brightest flashes in the universe were Tuesday named among the winners of the Shaw Prize, the $1 million award known as the Nobel Prize of the east.

NASA scientist Gerald Fishman and Italian astro-physicist Enrico Costa won the astronomy prize for their work on gamma rays.

A press statement from the organisers said they were picked "for their leadership of that enabled the demonstration of the cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts, the brightest sources known in the universe".

A is believed to mark the final death throe of a star as it collapses, billions of light years away from Earth.

The Shaw Prize, now in its eighth year, consists of three annual awards each carrying a $1 million prize.

The life science and medicine award went jointly to Jules Hoffmann, from the University of Strasbourg, Yale University's Ruslan Medzhitov and Bruce Beutler, from The Scripps Research Institute, California.

The trio shared the award for "their discovery of the molecular mechanism of innate immunity, the first line of defence against pathogens".

The third prize, for mathematical sciences, was shared by Demetrios Christodoulou, from the ETH Zurich, and Richard Hamilton, from Columbia University.

They were given the prize for their "highly innovative works on nonlinear partial differential equations" and their applications to and topology -- the study of geometrical shapes with unique properties.

The Shaw , funded by Hong Kong film producer and philanthropist Run Run Shaw, honours exceptional contributions "to the advancement of civilisation and the well-being of humankind".

The presentation ceremony is scheduled for September 28. For more detailed information, visit www.shawprize.org

Explore further: UCSC astronomer awarded top high-energy astronomy prize for work on supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

Related Stories

Worldwide hunt to solve the mystery of gamma-ray bursts

February 16, 2008

UK space scientist Emeritus Professor Alan Wells is to speak at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston in February on International Cooperation in Developing Swift and its Scientific Achievements.

Recommended for you

Fractals patterns in a drummer's music

August 28, 2015

Fractal patterns are profoundly human – at least in music. This is one of the findings of a team headed by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen and Harvard University ...

Pigments, organelles persist in fossil feathers

August 27, 2015

A study provides multiple lines of new evidence that pigments and the microbodies that produce them can remain evident in a dinosaur fossil. In the journal Scientific Reports, an international team of paleontologists correlates ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.