Atlantic hurricane season sticks to the calendar: System 93L

Jun 01, 2011
This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite on June 1 at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT) shows the low pressure area off the northeastern Florida coast as a small rounded area of clouds. The circular shaded areas in the center are higher thunderstorms. Credit: NASA/GOES Project

Hurricane season starts today, June 1, in the Atlantic Ocean and the tropics are paying attention to the calendar. The GOES-13 satellite has been capturing images of a low pressure area that formed off the North Carolina coast yesterday and is now located off of the northeastern Florida coast.

The low pressure area, also known as System 93L appears somewhat elongated, almost rounded area of clouds on the satellite imagery today, stretching from southwest to northeast. The called GOES-13 has been capturing imagery of the low since it formed. The visible image from June 1 at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT) has some shadows in the middle of the storm, which indicate that there are some towering, strong thunderstorms near the circulation center that are casting shadows onto the lower thunderstorms.

NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates imagery and animations of GOES satellite data. The GOES series of satellites are operated by the . To see the latest animation of the GOES in "Hurricane Alley" in the Atlantic Ocean visit: http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov and click on "Hurricane Alley HDTV" on the top right side of the NASA GOES webpage.

At 8 a.m. EDT, the center of the low was about 200 miles east of Jacksonville, Florida and was moving west-southwest near 20 mph. It is forecast to move over northern Florida later today toward the Florida Panhandle. It has a medium chance of becoming the Atlantic hurricane season's first tropical depression in the next 24 hours.

The low does mean some scattered strong thunderstorms are in the forecast for northeastern Florida and isolated thunderstorms in southeastern Georgia today. The noted that some of the thunderstorms could contain wind gusts to 50 mph, small hail, frequent cloud to ground lightning and heavy rainfall.

In addition to the threat of severe , the low is also creating rip currents and building swells along the eastern Florida beaches. For updates, visit NASA's Hurricane Web Page at: www.nasa.gov/.

If the low does intensify into a tropical storm it would receive the name Arlene. However, it must first reach tropical depression status. Even if it doesn't become a depression it still means severe weather for northeastern Florida and southeastern Georgia today.

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LariAnn
not rated yet Jun 01, 2011
Unless 93L can gestate to full term in the Gulf, this embryo looks like it will abort.

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