Judge won't guard fish farm from Grand Coulee flow

May 28, 2011 By TIM FOUGHT , Associated Press

(AP) -- A federal judge on Friday refused to order a cut in flows from the Grand Coulee Dam that threaten millions of fish raised in pens downstream in the Columbia River.

U.S. District Judge James Redden in Portland rejected the bid of a major regional seafood company to link the protection of the farmed fish to that of wild fish considered in jeopardy under the Endangered Species Act.

He said the company hadn't shown that the management of the dam in Washington state to prevent flooding in cities downstream had put any wild fish at risk. The doesn't cover farmed fish.

"I am sympathetic to their loss of unlisted fish," said Redden, who ruled briefly after a hearing arranged on short notice. He has presided over years of litigation about species of and steelhead listed as protected under the federal law.

The heavy flows through dam spillways churn the water, capturing dangerous levels of nitrogen from the air. The give fish the equivalent of the bends.

The is part of Pacific Seafood, which said the losses already number in the hundreds of thousands of farmed steelhead with 2.7 million more are at risk. Its lawyers and leaders said Friday they didn't know whether they would appeal to a higher court.

Federal dam managers have drawn down the reservoir behind the Grand Coulee Dam to make way for what's expected to be an unusual amount of runoff in coming weeks from snow still atop the .

The dam is critical to flood protection in Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash., where the Columbia has been hovering at flood stage.

The lawsuit is another indication of the stress on the Northwest's natural and economic resources resulting from a wet winter and a late spring.

River flows are already so high that the region's dams are running at capacity and providing all the electricity the region's grid can handle. Other has been curtailed - to the dismay of wind farm operators whose finances depend on tax credits and other benefits that are pegged to their output.

Explore further: Leave that iguana in the jungle, expert tells Costa Rica

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Northwest salmon recovery plan may include breaching dams

Sep 16, 2009

In a case closely followed by environmental and business interests, a rewritten plan for restoring endangered and threatened wild salmon runs on the Columbia and Snake rivers in Washington state and Idaho includes studying ...

Pike escape over dam feared

May 13, 2006

A heavier-than-normal snow melt could help the voracious non-native northern pike escape from the Plumas County, Calif., reservoir.

Recommended for you

Team defines new biodiversity metric

Aug 29, 2014

To understand how the repeated climatic shifts over the last 120,000 years may have influenced today's patterns of genetic diversity, a team of researchers led by City College of New York biologist Dr. Ana ...

Changes in farming and climate hurting British moths

Aug 29, 2014

Britain's moths are feeling the pinch – threatened on one side by climate change and on the other by habitat loss and harmful farming methods. A new study gives the most comprehensive picture yet of trends ...

User comments : 0