Virginia Tech mechanical engineers win measurement science best paper award

May 31, 2011
John Charonko, a member of the mechanical engineering faculy at Virginia Tech, is lead author on the paper, "Assessment of Pressure Field Calculations from Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements." Credit: Virginia Tech Photo

For the second consecutive year, members of Virginia Tech's Advanced Experimental Thermofluid Engineering Research (AEThER) Laboratory in mechanical engineering, directed by professor Pavlos P. Vlachos, professor of mechanical engineering, have received the Outstanding Paper Award in fluid mechanics from the Measurement Science and Technology Journal, published by the American Institute of Physics.

John J. Charonko, of Blacksburg, Va., who received his bachelor's and master's degrees in and mechanics, and his doctorate in biomedical engineering, all from Virginia Tech, was the lead author on the article. It was co-written with Cameron V. King, a graduate student in at Utah State University, Barton L. Smith, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Utah State University, and Vlachos.

Charonko is currently a research assistant professor in the mechanical engineering department at Virginia Tech.

In announcing the award, the editorial board of Measurement Science and Technology wrote that the paper addressed how to non-intrusively measure the pressure distribution at the interior of a flow field as, "one of the most challenging measurements" in this field of study. The board also credited the authors with "operating with the constraint of incomplete information," yet they "significantly advanced " these measurements.

"The ability to accurately estimate the pressure field inside a flow, and its variations in space and time without having to physically introduce invasive instruments such as probes, significantly augments our ability to investigate the flow phenomena and can have great impact on the way experiments and simulations interface with each other," Vlachos said. "Receiving this award is a great honor and speaks to the continuing quality of research produced by our group, further establishing our role in the area of fluid measurement science. It is unique getting this award twice, let alone in consecutive years."

The title of the paper was: "Assessment of Pressure Field Calculations from Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements. "

Last year, Vlachos and his co-author, graduate student Adric Eckstein of Salem, Va., received the same award for developing a new technique that is also expected to have substantial impact in the fluid-mechanics measurement field.

Vlachos has established a world-renowned program in experimental fluid mechanics and the development and use of digital particle image velocimetry for flow measurement. Applications for this research range from cardiovascular flows and biomedical devices to biologically inspired flows, to underwater weapons.

Throughout Vlachos' career, he has been the principal investigator (PI) or co-PI for 57 externally funded projects totaling $13.9 million in research expenditures with his share at $5.8 million. He has authored or co-authored 37 journal papers and 92 refereed papers in conference proceedings. His research so far has resulted in 10 intellectual property disclosures and four patents.

In 2009 he was appointed an associate editor of the ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering.

Explore further: Dismantling ships and the trajectory of steel

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New mixing method for microchip-sized labs

Dec 23, 2004

By alternating the flow of fluid through tiny plastic pipes, a team of mechanical engineers at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has discovered a new and speedier way to mix liquids, which in turn will someday produce ...

Photos show how a specific fluid defies normal activity

Nov 30, 2010

An illustration showing a scientific phenomenon that defies common intuition has garnered Sunghwan (Sunny) Jung, assistant professor of engineering science and mechanics at Virginia Tech, and his doctoral ...

New technique for nondestructive testing research

Apr 08, 2005

Technique uses vibration, heat detection to evaluate composite materials Ed Henneke, associate dean for research, and graduate studies in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, received the Award for Innovation in Non ...

Recommended for you

Engineering the Kelpies

23 minutes ago

Recently, Falkirk in Scotland saw the opening of the Kelpies, two thirty metre high horse head sculptures either side of a lock in a new canal extension.

Technology on the catwalk

33 minutes ago

Summer days bring thoughts of beach picnics, outdoor barbecues and pool parties. Yet it only takes the buzz of one tiny mosquito to dampen the fun.

Dismantling ships and the trajectory of steel

1 hour ago

Tell me how you dismantle a ship, and I'll tell how a region can prosper from its steel! This could be the motto of this master's cycle at ENAC during which the projects of two civil engineering students ...

Eye implant could lead to better glaucoma treatment

Aug 26, 2014

For the 2.2 million Americans battling glaucoma, the main course of action for staving off blindness involves weekly visits to eye specialists, who monitor—and control—increasing pressure within the eye.

Electricity helping the blind navigate

Aug 25, 2014

Specialists at the Monterrey Institute of Technology (ITESM) developed a device able to guide blind or visually impaired people in established routes through electrical stimulation of the organs associated ...

User comments : 0