Ubisoft going online with 'Ghost Recon' videogame

May 25, 2011
The logo of Ubisoft is seen at a games convention in Los Angeles. Ubisoft is crafting a free-to-play online version of its popular "Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon" shooter videogame.

Ubisoft is crafting a free-to-play online version of its popular "Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon" shooter videogame.

"Ghost Recon Online" is a deviation from the French videogame titan's roots making packaged titles for and comes with the rocketing popularity of online "" supported by ads or in-game transactions.

"The online market is an exciting new frontier for videogames and for gamers," chief executive Yves Guillemot said in a press release.

"With 'Ghost Recon Online,' and other major upcoming projects, Ubisoft is creating online experiences that allow our fans to stay connected to their favorite brands and to continually receive new content and game play."

The third-person based on Clancy's hit espionage novels is being developed by Ubisoft Singapore for online play using personal computers.

Limited testing of the multi-player game was to begin in coming weeks. Information about taking part in the "closed beta" test can be found online at GhostReconOnline.com.

"Our development teams are dedicated to making 'Ghost Recon Online' a truly unique, top-quality online title," said Ubisoft senior producer Hugues Ricour. "This game was designed from the start to be a free-to-play experience."

Ubisoft said it will back the game with services including regular events and updates, customized content based on community feedback, and live support.

While game play will be free, players will be able to purchase "premium items and fully personalize their experience."

"Ghost Recon" will be the first Ubisoft shooter game offered in the free-to-play format.

"This direct link with our fans will allow us to create new and ever better experiences for them," said Guillemot.

Explore further: Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ubisoft sends 'Assassins' to Facebook

Oct 01, 2010

French videogame titan Ubisoft is expanding the world of "Assassin's Creed" to Facebook, breaking down the barrier between play on consoles and at the hot online social network.

Recommended for you

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

12 hours ago

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Android gains in US, basic phones almost extinct

Apr 18, 2014

The Google Android platform grabbed the majority of mobile phones in the US market in early 2014, as consumers all but abandoned non-smartphone handsets, a survey showed Friday.

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

Apr 17, 2014

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Finnish inventor rethinks design of the axe

(Phys.org) —Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä is the man behind the Vipukirves Leveraxe, which is a precision tool for splitting firewood. He designed the tool to make the job easier and more efficient, with ...

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.