Spotify launches syncing with Apple's iPod

May 04, 2011
Swedish music streaming service Spotify launched an application enabling users to synchronise playlists and songs purchased through its service with Apple's iPod, a clear challenge to Apple's iTunes.

Swedish music streaming service Spotify on Wednesday launched an application enabling users to synchronise playlists and songs purchased through its service with Apple's iPod, a clear challenge to Apple's iTunes.

"You’ve also said you’re listening to a huge amount of music on your , and that getting your Spotify playlists onto them as MP3s has been a serious hassle, forcing you to juggle multiple music players. That’s until now," the company said in a statement.

"As of today, Spotify is making it possible for everyone to take their playlists with them in one lean, green music machine," it added.

The changes to Spotify will make it possible for users to import playlists created in Spotify directly to iPods and to manage music on their iPods through Spotify, without using Apple's iTunes.

The new service will be available both to Spotify's paying users and the users of its free version.

It marks a shift for the young Swedish company, which had previously focussed on online streaming.

"Our users don’t want to have to switch between music players, but they do want to take their playlists with them wherever they go, on a wider range of devices, more simply and at a price they can afford," co-founder Daniel Ek said.

The move comes less than a month after Spotify announced restrictions on its free version, slashing the amount of times a track can be played and the total amount of music users can listen to.

Founded in 2006, is one of the world's largest streaming websites and is available only in Sweden, Norway, Finland, Britain, France, Spain and the Netherlands because of copyright issues.

The company announced in March it reached one million paying users in March and it currently has around seven million users of its free version, the company's chief product officer Gustav Soederstroem told news agency TT.

Explore further: Digital dilemma: How will US respond to Sony hack?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Spotify slaps limits on free music service

Apr 14, 2011

Swedish music streaming service Spotify said on Thursday it would cut back on its free version, slashing the amount of times a track can be played and the total amount of music users can listen to.

Spotify reaches one million paying users

Mar 08, 2011

Swedish music streaming service Spotify said Tuesday it had reached one million paying users, a number that has doubled in under a year but still represents fewer than one out of six Spotify users.

Spotify launches on Apple's iPhone

Sep 07, 2009

Spotify, the Swedish music streaming website, on Monday announced the launch of its software on Apple's iPhone, the best-selling handset that features high speed internet access.

Spotify launches application for Nokia phones

Nov 23, 2009

Swedish streaming software Spotify announced on Monday the launch of a music application for the Symbian platform, used by the world's biggest mobile phone maker Nokia and other smartphones.

Recommended for you

Digital dilemma: How will US respond to Sony hack?

Dec 18, 2014

The detective work blaming North Korea for the Sony hacker break-in appears so far to be largely circumstantial, The Associated Press has learned. The dramatic conclusion of a Korean role is based on subtle ...

UN General Assembly OKs digital privacy resolution

Dec 18, 2014

The U.N. General Assembly has approved a resolution demanding better digital privacy protections for people around the world, another response to Edward Snowden's revelations about U.S. government spying.

Online privacy to remain thorny issue: survey

Dec 18, 2014

Online privacy will remain a thorny issue over the next decade, without a widely accepted system that balances user rights and personal data collection, a survey of experts showed Thursday.

Spain: Google News vanishes amid 'Google Tax' spat

Dec 16, 2014

Google on Tuesday followed through with a pledge to shut down Google News in Spain in reaction to a Spanish law requiring news publishers to receive payment for content even if they are willing to give it away.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.