A spiral galaxy that resembles our Milky Way

June 1, 2011
This picture of the nearby galaxy NGC 6744 was taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at La Silla. The large spiral galaxy is similar to the Milky Way, making this image look like a picture postcard of our own galaxy sent from extragalactic space. The picture was created from exposures taken through four different filters that passed blue, yellow-green, red light, and the glow coming from hydrogen gas. These are shown in this picture as blue, green, orange and red, respectively.

(PhysOrg.com) -- ESO astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope to capture an image of NGC 6744. This impressive spiral galaxy lies about 30 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Pavo (The Peacock). But this view could almost be a picture postcard of our own Milky Way, taken and sent by an extragalactic friend, as this galaxy closely resembles our own.

We see NGC 6744 almost face on, meaning we get a dramatic bird’s eye view of the galaxy’s structure. If we had the technology to escape the and could look down on it from intergalactic space, this view is close to the one we would see — striking spiral arms wrapping around a dense, elongated nucleus and a dusty disc. There is even a distorted companion galaxy — NGC 6744A, seen here as a smudge to the lower right of NGC 6744, which is reminiscent of one of the Milky Way’s neighbouring Magellanic Clouds.

One difference between NGC 6744 and the Milky Way is their size. While our galaxy is roughly 100 000 light-years across, the galaxy pictured here extends to almost twice this diameter. Nevertheless, NGC 6744 gives us a tantalising sense of how a distant observer might see our own galactic home.

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This sequence starts with a view of the southern part of the Milky Way. As we zoom in we can first see the globular star cluster NGC 6752 and then the spiral galaxy NGC 6744, lying about 30 million light-years from us in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock). We also catch a glimpse of the small irregular galaxy NGC 6744A, which lies close to NGC 6744. The final detailed view shows a new image of NGC 6744 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile. Credit: ESO/S. Brunier and Digitized Sky Survey 2

This dramatic object is one of the largest and nearest spiral . Although it has a brightness of about 60 billion Suns, its light spreads across a large area in the sky — about two thirds the width of the full Moon, making the galaxy appear as a hazy glow with a bright centre through a small telescope. Still, it is one of the most beautiful objects in the southern sky, and it can be identified by amateur as an oval shape contrasting with a rich background of stars.

With professional telescopes such as the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at La Silla, which captured this image, NGC 6744 can be seen in all its glory. The dusty spiral arms are home to many glowing star-forming regions (seen in red) and give this Milky Way look-alike its striking spiral form.

This picture was taken by the attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile. The picture was created from exposures taken through four different filters that passed blue, yellow-green and red light and the glow coming from hydrogen gas. These are shown in this picture as blue, green, orange and red, respectively.

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9 comments

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kevinrtrs
2 / 5 (4) Jun 01, 2011
If this galaxy is twice the diameter it contains about 600-800 billion stars !!! That is just using a figure of about 200 billion stars in the Milky way and an area of 4 times greater.
Makes the mind boggle.
okwa76
5 / 5 (2) Jun 01, 2011
Who can look at this and have the gall to think that we are the unique intelligent life in the universe?
LKD
not rated yet Jun 01, 2011
Who can look at this and have the gall to think that we are the unique intelligent life in the universe?


I do! XD Ok, done being contrary.
omatumr
Jun 01, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Ethelred
5 / 5 (2) Jun 01, 2011
The Black Hole is still there in our galaxy. Since it did NOT fragment your theory isn't. Its just crap.

Ethlered
whoyagonacal
5 / 5 (2) Jun 01, 2011
Try reporting OKM's posting as inappropriate. Enough of his spam.
Beard
5 / 5 (2) Jun 02, 2011
Who can look at this and have the gall to think that we are the unique intelligent life in the universe?


It's not gall, we just have no perspective yet. It's entirely possible that life is exceedingly rare and intelligent life even more so. We don't know yet, but that is one of the great mysteries we might solve in the coming decades.
_ilbud
1 / 5 (3) Jun 02, 2011
It's irrelevant if there's other life out there, we'll never meet or communicate with them and we'll never leave this planet except for research and industry in the solar system. Star trek is fiction. There is no data whatsoever to suggest any life outside the Earth. The assumption of mediocrity may be appropriate for the individual concerned but there's no need for projection.
whoyagonacal
5 / 5 (3) Jun 02, 2011

It's not gall, we just have no perspective yet. It's entirely possible that life is exceedingly rare and intelligent life even more so. We don't know yet, but that is one of the great mysteries we might solve in the coming decades.


Ditto. We have a sample size of one bioplanet to extrapolate from, and that doesn't do us much good. As the saying goes: Either we are alone or we aren't, and either idea is mind-boggling.

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