New species of Encholirium (Bromeliaceae) from Brazil

May 05, 2011
Habitat of Encholirium agavoides (Image: Daniela Zappi, RBG Kew)

(PhysOrg.com) -- Two new bromeliads discovered as part of the Toucan Cipó Project in Minas Gerais.

The two new species of Encholirium (Bromeliaceae) were found during fieldwork for the Toucan Cipó Project, in the Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

They occur only on quartz/sandstone rocks above 1000 m altitude, and the populations are found within 10-12 km of each other. Encholirium agavoides has striking silvery leaves and a small, agave-like habit while Encholirium ctenophyllum can be distinguished by its narrow, comb-like leaves.

These discoveries were made in the course of a project aiming to increase knowledge and awareness of the exceptionally diverse flora of one of ’s ‘biodiversity hotspots’ and to promote the establishment of new protected areas in the region.

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Provided by Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

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