Space Image: Another view of ISS spacewalker

May 30, 2011
Image Credit: NASA

A fish-eye lens attached to an electronic still camera was used to capture this image of NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff during the mission's fourth STS-134 spacewalk.

During the spacewalk, Chamitoff and fellow astronaut Michael Fincke stowed the 50-foot-long boom and added a power and data grapple fixture to make it the Enhanced Boom Assembly, which extends the reach of the space station's robotic arm.

The docked is visible at top right.

Explore further: Space Image: Anchored

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