Sony Ericsson's Canada site hacked: company

May 25, 2011 by Yuka Ito
A visitor to a consumer telecommunications fair checks a mobile phone. Hackers have attacked Sony Ericsson's Canadian eShop website, affecting 2,000 users, the latest online strike against the Japanese electronics and entertainment giant, a Sony spokesman said Wednesday.

Hackers have attacked Sony Ericsson's Canadian eShop website, affecting 2,000 users, the latest online strike against the Japanese electronics and entertainment giant, a Sony spokesman said Wednesday.

The new security breach follows the theft of personal data since last month from its PlayStation Network, Sony Online Entertainment and Qriocity services, including names, passwords and addresses from more than 100 million accounts.

In further attacks this week, Sony said on Tuesday that 8,500 Greek user accounts had been compromised and its sites hit in Thailand and Indonesia.

The company said Monday that data breaches will result in at least a $170 million hit in known costs to operating profit this financial year.

"This is an ongoing problem, and the size of the damage is still unclear," Ryosuke Katsura, senior analyst at Mizuho Securities, told AFP.

"The market is expecting that Sony may need to pay compensation to affected customers. Concerns also linger that the size of the damage may be larger than currently expected if they file lawsuits against the company."

Sony's share price dropped 1.49 percent to 2,236 yen in Tokyo Wednesday.

Katsura added that "the ongoing problem is expected to put a drag on Sony between six months and a year, but if the company takes it as a lesson and reinforces its systems, it would be rather positive for its growth from 2013."

The most recent attack -- targeting the mobile telephone joint venture between Sony and Sweden's Ericsson -- was discovered on Tuesday local time, and the affected website was shut down, a Sony spokesman told AFP.

"Sony Ericsson's website in Canada, which advertises its products, has been hacked, affecting 2,000 people," he told AFP.

"Their personal information was posted on a website called 'The Hacker News'. The information includes registered names, email addresses and encrypted passwords. But it does not include credit card information."

The link to the Sony Ericsson eShop site featured a message that said "D'oh! The page you are looking for has gone walkabout. Sorry."

The series of breaches has damaged Sony's brand image and undermined its efforts to link its gadgets to an online "cloud-based" network of games, movies and music that relies on consumer confidence in their security.

On Monday Sony said it expected to post a $3.2 billion dollar net loss for the fiscal year ended March as it tries to recover from the impact of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, which ravaged production and damaged facilities.

It said the data breach will result in at least a $170 million hit in "currently known costs" to operating profit this financial year in terms of insurance and damages, but that it anticipated further costs.

Sony has said it plans to fully restore PlayStation Network and Qriocity services by the end of the month.

Sony CEO Howard Stringer has apologised in a letter to customers and said the company is "working with the FBI and other law enforcement agencies around the world to apprehend those responsible".

Explore further: Hackers swiped PlayStation Network user data: Sony (Update 2)

Related Stories

Sony removes data posted by hackers

May 7, 2011

Sony said Saturday about 2,500 customers' names and partial addresses stolen by hackers had been discovered posted online as it struggled to recover from the biggest-ever Internet security break-in.

More Sony websites hacked, 8,500 Greek accounts hit

May 24, 2011

Sony on Tuesday said its websites in three countries had been hacked with 8,500 Greek user accounts compromised, in a blow to efforts to restore confidence after a huge data breach affecting millions.

Recommended for you

How to curb emissions? Put a price on carbon

September 3, 2015

Literally putting a price on carbon pollution and other greenhouse gasses is the best approach for nurturing the rapid growth of renewable energy and reducing emissions.

Customizing 3-D printing

September 3, 2015

The technology behind 3-D printing is growing more and more common, but the ability to create designs for it is not. Any but the simplest designs require expertise with computer-aided design (CAD) applications, and even for ...

Magnetic fields provide a new way to communicate wirelessly

September 1, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a new wireless communication technique that works by sending magnetic signals through the human body. The new technology could offer a lower power ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Rutzs
3 / 5 (2) May 25, 2011
"Sony CEO Howard Stringer has apologised in a letter to customers and said the company is "working with the FBI and other law enforcement agencies around the world to apprehend those responsible"."

Instead of looking for who is responsible, why not work on making the systems more secure?

By threatening the "persons responsible", you will just aggravate the hacking community and make more enemies.

You have to remember, this all started when Sony began to apprehend hackers for modding the PS3.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.