Two robots to do our dirty work (w/ video)

May 03, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog
Two robots to do our dirty work

(PhysOrg.com) -- Today's tale of robots is a double feature. That is right, we are going to look at not one, but two of the bots who are making our lives not only more interesting, but safer. The digital eyes and ears of the future are here today! Let's get a sneak peek.

Our first feature creature is the ReconRobotic's line of throwable surveillance robots. They have just come out with a new model, which has a snazzy new feature that give it a significant advantage over the previous models. The new ReconRobot will be able to drive up a sheer vertical surface. Before you start to wonder if this machine is capable of bending the laws of physics, you have to know the catch. The surface that it is driving up has to be made of metal. This clever little uses the laws of magnetism in order to make its climb.

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Ship-Boarding Prototype Robot

Specific applications for this bot are found on the high seas. When dealing with a situation where pirates have taken a ship, this bot would be able to scout the ship, and get an idea of what is going on before lives are risked in a hostage extraction.

Two robots to do our dirty work

Our second bot extraordinaire, known as the Recon Scout Throwbot, has been around for a while, but recently gained approval for use in both police and fire applications. This small bot, which comes in at only eight inches long, can be thrown through a window, or through a fire laden floor, without taking any damage. The bot then transmits video to the base camp.

Recon Scout Throwbot

The bot has already been in use by the military in both Iraq and Afghanistan, so it has been field tested. There is only one snag about using the Recon Scout Throwbot, and that is the . The transmits on the same frequency of amateur radio enthusiasts, which means that using it in the area means getting a waiver. The waver was obtained with the help of the law firm of Fletcher, Heald, and Hildreth.

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Recon Scout thrown up three stories

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Explore further: A robot dives into search for Malaysian Airlines flight

More information: www.reconrobotics.com/index.cfm

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User comments : 8

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sigfpe
5 / 5 (1) May 03, 2011
What's "armature radio"?
rgwalther
5 / 5 (1) May 03, 2011
What's "armature radio"?


That's a radio set that has not yet grown up.
LariAnn
3 / 5 (2) May 03, 2011
"The waver was obtained with the help of the law firm of Fletcher, Heald, and Hildreth. "

I didn't know you needed the help of a law firm to get someone to wave for you!
LariAnn
1 / 5 (1) May 03, 2011
Also, reference the "armature radio" - perhaps it is a special tiny transmitter installed in electric motors?
rgwalther
not rated yet May 03, 2011
*law firm of Fletcher, Heald, and Hildreth.*

Notice: this law firm has been assimilated by the larger Firm of, Rippem, Phukum, Tarem and Scrough, LLc
Skeptic_Heretic
not rated yet May 03, 2011
Also, reference the "armature radio" - perhaps it is a special tiny transmitter installed in electric motors?

Amateur radio or armchair radio enthusiast.

I'm guessing it was a poor edit.
rgwalther
5 / 5 (2) May 03, 2011
I'm guessing it was a poor edit.


There are no poor edits, only poor editors...
robvoodoo
not rated yet May 03, 2011
"waiver" if the editors care...

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