Radio telescopes capture best-ever snapshot of black hole jets (w/ video)

May 21, 2011
Merging X-ray data (blue) from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory with microwave (orange) and visible images reveals the jets and radio-emitting lobes emanating from Centaurus A's central black hole. Credit: ESO/WFI (visible); MPIfR/ESO/APEX/A.Weiss et al. (microwave); NASA/CXC/CfA/R.Kraft et al. (X-ray)

(PhysOrg.com) -- An international team, including NASA-funded researchers, using radio telescopes located throughout the Southern Hemisphere has produced the most detailed image of particle jets erupting from a supermassive black hole in a nearby galaxy.

"These jets arise as infalling matter approaches the black hole, but we don't yet know the details of how they form and maintain themselves," said Cornelia Mueller, the study's lead author and a doctoral student at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany.

The new image shows a region less than 4.2 light-years across -- less than the distance between our sun and the nearest star. Radio-emitting features as small as 15 light-days can be seen, making this the highest-resolution view of galactic jets ever made. The study will appear in the June issue of and is available online.

Mueller and her team targeted Centaurus A (Cen A), a nearby galaxy with a weighing 55 million times the sun's mass. Also known as NGC 5128, Cen A is located about 12 million light-years away in the and is one of the first celestial radio sources identified with a galaxy.

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Centaurus A is a giant elliptical active galaxy 12 million light-years away. At its heart lies a black hole with a mass of 55 million suns. Now, the TANAMI project has provided the best-ever image of particle jets powered by the black hole, revealing features as small as 15 light-days across. The jets feed vast lobes of radio-emitting gas that reach far beyond the visible galaxy.

Seen in , Cen A is one of the biggest and brightest objects in the sky, nearly 20 times the apparent size of a full moon. This is because the visible galaxy lies nestled between a pair of giant radio-emitting lobes, each nearly a million light-years long.

These lobes are filled with matter streaming from particle jets near the galaxy's central black hole. Astronomers estimate that matter near the base of these jets races outward at about one-third the speed of light.

Using an intercontinental array of nine , researchers for the TANAMI (Tracking with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry) project were able to effectively zoom into the galaxy's innermost realm.

"Advanced computer techniques allow us to combine data from the individual telescopes to yield images with the sharpness of a single giant telescope, one nearly as large as Earth itself," said Roopesh Ojha at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The enormous energy output of galaxies like Cen A comes from gas falling toward a black hole weighing millions of times the sun's mass. Through processes not fully understood, some of this infalling matter is ejected in opposing jets at a substantial fraction of the speed of light. Detailed views of the jet's structure will help astronomers determine how they form.

The jets strongly interact with surrounding gas, at times possibly changing a galaxy's rate of star formation. Jets play an important but poorly understood role in the formation and evolution of galaxies.

Left: The giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 is the radio source known as Centaurus A. Vast radio-emitting lobes (shown as orange in this optical/radio composite) extend nearly a million light-years from the galaxy. Credit: Capella Observatory (optical), with radio data from Ilana Feain, Tim Cornwell, and Ron Ekers (CSIRO/ATNF), R. Morganti (ASTRON), and N. Junkes (MPIfR). Right: The radio image from the TANAMI project provides the sharpest-ever view of a supermassive black hole's jets. This view reveals the inner 4.16 light-years of the jet and counterjet, a span less than the distance between our sun and the nearest star. The image resolves details as small as 15 light-days across. Undetected between the jets is the galaxy's 55-million-solar-mass black hole. Credit: Credit: NASA/TANAMI/Müller et al.

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected much higher-energy radiation from Cen A's central region. "This radiation is billions of times more energetic than the radio waves we detect, and exactly where it originates remains a mystery," said Matthias Kadler at the University of Wuerzburg in Germany and a collaborator of Ojha. "With TANAMI, we hope to probe the galaxy's innermost depths to find out."

Ojha is funded through a Fermi investigation on multiwavelength studies of Active Galactic Nuclei.

The astronomers credit continuing improvements in the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) with TANAMI's enormously increased image quality and resolution. The project augments the LBA with telescopes in South Africa, Chile and Antarctica to explore the brightest galactic in the southern sky.

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pibaw
1 / 5 (1) May 21, 2011
"This video is not supported by your browser at this time."
Anyone knows how to see otherwise this video?
Dhanne
not rated yet May 21, 2011
@pibaw,

downloading the newest JW Player might help to your problem. http://www.longta...v-player
The newest flash player does the same.
tigger
4.8 / 5 (12) May 21, 2011
If instr(strCommentPost,"etradinglife") > 0 Then
'ignore
Else
'post comment
End if
MorituriMax
5 / 5 (1) May 21, 2011
"This video is not supported by your browser at this time."
Anyone knows how to see otherwise this video?


If you're running the noscript add-on, allow all this page?
pibaw
not rated yet May 21, 2011
My fault, was thinking about a region issue - sometimes I cannot see videos form other countries.
Problem solved, thank you.
marraco
2.5 / 5 (4) May 21, 2011
If instr(strCommentPost,"etradinglife") > 0 Then
'ignore
Else
'post comment
End if

Is better to post the comment for some seconds, then delete it. That way the spammers will believe they were successful. Otherwise they just will adapt to the filter.
toyo
3.5 / 5 (2) May 21, 2011
Quote: "Centaurus A (Cen A), a nearby galaxy ...is located about 12 million light-years away"

I know we're talking relative distances here, but it seems a bit of a stretch to call anything 12 million light years away as being "nearby".
epsi00
not rated yet May 21, 2011
My fault, was thinking about a region issue - sometimes I cannot see videos form other countries.
Problem solved, thank you.


you don't have to allow all, just few of them and on a temporary basis.
HarshMistress
5 / 5 (1) May 22, 2011
@toyo:

I know we're talking relative distances here, but it seems a bit of a stretch to call anything 12 million light years away as being "nearby".


From Wikipedia:

What follows is a list of all known galaxies within 3.6 megaparsecs (11.7 million light-years) of Earth, in order of proximity to Earth.

3.6 Mpc was chosen as a cut off point because this is the distance approximately to the centers of the next two large galaxy groups - the M81 Group and the Centaurus A/M83 Group. This vast spherical region of space centered on the Earth is mostly empty but encompasses all 50 or so Local Group galaxies and the closer members of several nearby galaxy groups as well as a few isolated galaxies that do not appear to be part of any defined group.
spectator
not rated yet May 22, 2011
Hehe...

Event horizon radius is ~162 million KM from the CoG of the super massive black hole, making the event horizon the surface of a sphere of slightly more than one astronomical unit radius.

The black hole's relative escape velocity is still similar to Earth's escape velocity from a distance of 5341 light years, not counting the gravity of all the other stars that would be contained inside the sphere of that high of a radius, which is probably more than the mass of the black hole itself....
ubavontuba
1.6 / 5 (5) May 22, 2011
Is there a significance in the apparent axial tilt, indicated by the jets, relative to the galaxy?

Is there a significance to the apparent difference in energy between the two jets?

spectator
5 / 5 (1) May 22, 2011
Is there a significance in the apparent axial tilt, indicated by the jets, relative to the galaxy?


Implies the black hole's axis of rotation is pointed a few degrees away from the axis of rotation of the remainder of the galaxy.

This could be explained in several ways:

1) Small galactic merger in the past, having a different galactic plane.

2) Original galaxy may have been more spherical, but other planes of orbit didn't have enough velocity. These would collapse to the black hole and give it an inclined rotation due to conservation of angular momentum.

Is there a significance to the apparent difference in energy between the two jets?


The black hole's axis is not pointing along any orthogonal vector with respect to the earth's location. One of the black hole's polar jets points slightly towards us while the other points slightly away. This causes the closer jet to appear larger due to foreshortening, and brighter due to inverse square law.
jibbles
3 / 5 (2) May 22, 2011
no uma thurmr?! where is oh my tumor?
ssco00
not rated yet May 23, 2011
The video works fine in Explorer and Chrome. In Firefox, clicking on "Allow all this page" will do it.