The NutriSmart system would put RFIDs into your food for enhanced information

May 31, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- RFID, short for Radio Frequency ID, tags have found their way into a wide variety of applications. These pellets, which are often roughly the same size as a grain of rice, can help us to be reunited with our lost pets, keep towels inside the hotel, and keep big box stores shipping the right boxes to the right places at the right time.

In time you may even find them inside your own . At least they will be there if Hannes Harms has anything to say about it. Mr. Harms, who is currently a design engineering student at the Royal College of Art in London, has designed the NutriSmart system. The system is based on edible that will tell you more about your food then you ever wanted to know.

The system would be able to not only give you complete nutritional data on the food that you are about to consume, but able to tell you the entire supply chain behind everything that you are putting into your mouth. While this could be good news for diabetics, people with serious allergies, and vegans, it also has applications outside of the medical.

A properly equipped refrigerator would be able to give the user a look at everything that the box contains, and when it is going to go bad.

The system can also be paired with a "Smart plate", which would allow the embedded reader in the dish to tell you about the caloric and nutrition information about what you are eating, as well as how many miles it has come to be on your plate. The data can then be sent to your cell phone, via a Bluetooth connection.

No word yet about what happens to the tags when you are finished with them.

Explore further: Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

Related Stories

Portable RFID reader in a Wristwatch

Jul 14, 2004

During Embedded Systems Expo and Conference held at Tokyo Big Sight, Professor Ken Sakamura of the University of Tokyo unveiled the "UC-Watch," a radio frequency identification (RFID) reader developed by the YRP Ubiquitous ...

First Handheld Bluetooth RFID Reader

Sep 20, 2004

Cathexis Innovations Inc., a leader in RFID-enabling technologies, and Baracoda SA, which is at the forefront of Bluetooth wireless technology, announced today that they have developed and launched the beta version of the first handheld Bluetooth 13.56MHz RFID ...

NIST Issues Guidelines for Ensuring RFID Security

Apr 27, 2007

Retailers, manufacturers, hospitals, federal agencies and other organizations planning to use radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to improve their operations should also systematically evaluate the possible security ...

Recommended for you

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

3 hours ago

The interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often remarkably high compared to normal tissues and is thought to impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation ...

Tim Cook puts personal touch on iPhone 6 launch

4 hours ago

Apple chief Tim Cook personally kicked off sales of the iPhone 6, joining in "selfies" and shaking hands with customers Friday outside the company's store near his Silicon Valley home.

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

19 hours ago

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

19 hours ago

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

User comments : 10

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

socean
5 / 5 (4) May 31, 2011
"No word yet about what happens to the tags when you are finished with them."

Should be able tell which poo belongs to who. Waste treatment plants will be data centers.
BillFox
not rated yet May 31, 2011
Lol would be fun to take a scanner to people and tell them why their fat
allgencompanioncare
1 / 5 (1) May 31, 2011
How do I get one?
CSharpner
3 / 5 (2) May 31, 2011
Lol would be fun to take a scanner to people and tell them why their fat

Oooh! I didn't think of THAT! Every door you walk through could read your stomach contents... including your employer who could send it directly to your health insurance provider. Pretty scary to think of the type of abuse this could cause, assuming they don't digest quickly. Pretty freakin' cool though!

Gives new meaning to "wanting to get off the grid".
Na_Reth
May 31, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Vendicar_Decarian
May 31, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
plasticpower
2.7 / 5 (3) Jun 01, 2011
As a project for my entrepreneurship class I came up with an idea to have RFID tags on TV dinners and microwaveable items so that the microwave oven can automatically pick the right settings and time to perfectly cook the meal every time. I wasn't serious about making it, but I'm glad someone figured it out!
CSharpner
3 / 5 (2) Jun 01, 2011
As a project for my entrepreneurship class I came up with an idea to have RFID tags on TV dinners and microwaveable items so that the microwave oven can automatically pick the right settings and time to perfectly cook the meal every time. I wasn't serious about making it, but I'm glad someone figured it out!

That would be a great use for them... not sure if I care for them in the actual food though.

Vendicar, WTH? I reported you for abuse because your comment violates many of Physorg's comments guidelines of which the link can be found at the bottom of all the comment pages...

Here', I'll post it again here in case you have trouble finding it:

http://www.physor...omments/

Enough with the trolling and baiting for fights. Physorg's comments guidelines are reasonable and essentially say, be civil and stay on topic. Nobody cares that you hate people who disagree with your politics. Keep it to yourself.
Originalis
3 / 5 (2) Jun 04, 2011
What? No whack Tard Conservatives here whining about how this is all a Liberevil Gubderment power grab to give the Illuminati Grey Aliens more control over the fat intake of Obese American Republicans.

Oh, the humanity....

I have some conservative viewpoints. These so called 'progressive' advances that are being introduced are mostly aimed at controlling and deforming humanity.
But well hey I'm not stopping anyone from deforming and enslaving themselves. Best of luck :)
bugmenot23
3 / 5 (2) Jun 04, 2011
Vendicar: Not to disappoint.

http://www.natura...ood.html

They think it's an evil plot, and they say why. Minor problem is that they are not "whack tard conservatives" but if it makes you feel better, you can pretend they are.
CSharpner
not rated yet Jun 06, 2011
Vendicar: Not to disappoint.

http://www.natura...ood.html

They think it's an evil plot, and they say why. Minor problem is that they are not "whack tard conservatives" but if it makes you feel better, you can pretend they are.


ROTFLOL! Excellent! Vendicar looks for reasons to hate people who don't conform to his thought process (he has no tolerance of people who are different than he is), creates straw-men, and puts the immature "whack tard conservative" label on those straw-men. When no good reason exists, he apparently makes up reasons, as in this thread. Funny when the straw-man he thought he created turns out to have already existed as real and were not who he wanted everyone to think they were, but actually turns out to be more closely related to what he perceives as "his" people.

Love it!
unknownorgin
1 / 5 (1) Jun 10, 2011
After all the fear about electromagnetic energy from cell phones it is unlikely this idea will go very far when people learn that RFID also uses radio frequencys. Of couse RFID is harmless but fear always overpowers fact.