NASA counting down again for next-to-last launch

May 13, 2011 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
The astronauts of space shuttle Endeavour, from left, commander Mark Kelly, Canadian born U.S. astronaut Greg Chamitoff, mission specialist Drew Feustel, European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, mission specialist Mike Fincke and British born U.S. astronaut, pilot Greg Johnson, gather for a photo after arriving at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Thursday, May 12, 2011. The astronauts for NASA's next-to-last space shuttle flight returned to Florida on Thursday for another try at launching to the International Space Station. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

(AP) -- NASA's countdown clocks are ticking again for the next-to-last space shuttle launch.

The countdown began Friday morning for the second time for Endeavour's final mission. A launch attempt late last month was foiled by an electrical snag aboard Endeavour. NASA says repairs have fixed the problem.

Commander Mark Kelly and his five crewmates returned to Kennedy Space Center on Thursday. Their families will follow this weekend, including Kelly's wife, Arizona Rep. , who was shot in the head in January.

Endeavour will fly to the and deliver a $2 billion science experiment. Four spacewalks are planned during the 16-day mission.

Only one other remains, by Atlantis in July.

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