NASA administrator visits jupiter-Bound spacecraft

May 06, 2011 By DC Agle
NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, left, listens to Juno program manager for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company Tim Gasparrini as they view the Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft on Thursday, May 5, 2011, at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

(PhysOrg.com) -- NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visited NASA's Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft on Thursday, May 5, 2011, at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla. The solar-powered Juno spacecraft will orbit Jupiter's poles 33 times to find out more about the gas giant's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Juno will be carried into space aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, lifting off from Launch Complex-41 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The launch period opens Aug. 5, 2011, and extends through Aug. 26. For an Aug. 5 liftoff, the launch window opens at 8:39 a.m. PDT (11:39 am EDT) and remains open through 9:39 a.m. PDT (12:39 p.m. EDT).

NASA's , Pasadena, Calif., manages the for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute at San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed at NASA's in Huntsville, Ala. , Denver, built the spacecraft. Launch management for the mission is the responsibility of NASA's Launch Services Program at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

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Tuxford
1 / 5 (2) May 06, 2011
Must compensate for Pioneer Effect to get accurate velocity data needed to map Jupiter central core mass. Photon blue-shifting on maser signal interpreted as unknown force acting on spacecraft?
barakn
5 / 5 (1) May 10, 2011
You are way, way behind on your reading, apparently. The Pioneer effect has been solved, and it's simply thermal radiation.
Tuxford
1 / 5 (2) May 10, 2011
Nonsense. The thermal contribution may only account for about half the discrepancy, and the effect is not limited to Pioneer. Here is some reading for you.

http://www.davidd...aly.html

http://www.physor...ors.html
yyz
5 / 5 (1) May 10, 2011
"Nonsense. The thermal contribution may only account for about half the discrepancy, and the effect is not limited to Pioneer. Here is some reading for you....."

LMAO. From your PO source:

"Portuguese physicists used detailed computer modeling to produce the most precise simulation of Pioneer heat flow yet...They conclude that heat does the trick and "unless new data arises, the puzzle of the anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer probes can finally be put to rest.""

"Alan Stern [PI for New Horizons].... said that "I don't think there is any longer any credible evidence" that the Pioneer anomaly originates from anything but heat."

"Jonathan Katz, a physics professor at Washington University.... suggesting in 1999 that indeed heat is the culprit."
"Katz said that if he were the referee on the Portuguese paper, "I'd recommend publication.""

And David Darling needs to update his page on the Pioneer Anomaly.

Do you even read the links you post?

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