Mars Rover driving leaves distinctive tracks

May 19, 2011 By Guy Webster
A dance-step pattern is visible in the wheel tracks near the left edge of this scene recorded by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

(PhysOrg.com) -- When NASA's Opportunity Mars rover uses an onboard navigation capability during backward drives, it leaves a distinctive pattern in the wheel tracks visible on the Martian ground.

The team routinely commands Opportunity to drive backward as a precaution for extending the life of the rover's right-front wheel, which has been drawing more electrical current than the other five wheels. Rover drivers can command the rover to check for potential hazards in the drive direction, whether the rover is driving backward or forward. In that autonomous navigation mode, the rover pauses frequently, views the ground with the on its mast, analyzes the stereo images, and makes a decision about proceeding.

When the drive is backward, the drive-direction view from the navigation camera is partially blocked by an antenna in the middle of the rover. Therefore, at each pause to check for hazards, the rover pivots slightly to the side to get a clear view. If it sees no hazard, it turns back to the direction it was going and continues the drive for about another 4 feet (1.2 meters) before checking again. This set of activities leaves tracks showing the slight turnout on a rhythmically repeated basis, like a dance step.

Opportunity has driven more than 1.6 miles (about 2.6 kilometers) since leaving "Santa Maria" crater in late March and resuming a long-term trek toward the much larger Endeavour crater. Opportunity has now driven more than 18 miles (29 kilometers) on Mars.

Opportunity and its twin rover, Spirit, completed their three-month prime missions on Mars in April 2004. Both rovers continued in years of bonus, extended missions. Both have made important discoveries about wet environments on that may have been favorable for supporting . Spirit has not communicated with Earth since March 2010.

Explore further: Meteorite study indicates volcanic activity on early small asteroids

More information: The pattern appears in an image posted at photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/cata… g/?IDNumber=PIA14129

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CSharpner
4 / 5 (2) May 19, 2011
Mars Rover driving leaves distinctive tracks

Good thing. That way its tracks won't be confused with all the others on that high traffic planet. heh.
neiorah
3 / 5 (2) May 19, 2011
And this is news to you? The pic is cool but the tracks that the rover left are so unimportant, I cannot believe someone had to write about it. Sorry to the author of the article
scidog
5 / 5 (2) May 20, 2011
it's not so much about the tracks but an example of the Rovers decision making process.