Falcons and snakes call Sydney home

May 23, 2011
An ecology survey of Sydney's inner city has found it is home to a variety of wildlife, including peregrine falcons and the dangerous red-bellied black snake.

An ecology survey of Sydney's inner city Monday found it is home to a variety of wildlife, including peregrine falcons and the dangerous red-bellied black snake.

The survey was conducted over three months by ecologists in parks, along foreshores and in other public spaces within the city.

"This is the first time we have ever carried out an ecology survey across the city so the results are extremely important," Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore said.

"The unusual species we found are as important as the ones we didn't find."

The survey recorded a total of five , eight reptile, seven native mammal and about 40 in the centre of the city, including common ringtail possums, tawny frogmouth birds and the threatened green and golden bell frog.

It also revealed a noticeable absence of small birds, which usually rely on dense shrub vegetation for survival.

A total of 360 native plant species were recorded.

The city will use the results to prepare an action plan to help prioritise the conservation of locally indigenous plant and .

Explore further: From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientist exposes threat to backyard bird diversity

Oct 29, 2007

A leading environmental scientist from the University of Western Sydney has revealed that parrots commonly thought of as native to Sydney, are in fact invaders from inland areas of Australia, and their growing presence is ...

New golden frog discovered in remote region of Colombia

Aug 28, 2007

A new poisonous frog was recently discovered in a remote mountainous region in Colombia by a team of young scientists supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP). The new frog, which is almost two centimetres ...

Plague on their house, but bush rats fight back

Nov 03, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Sydney's native bush rats were unintended victims of a campaign to exterminate foreign black rats during a plague epidemic in 1900, according to new research by scientists who plan to reintroduce ...

Bush rats fight back

Nov 10, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Sydney's native bush rats were unintended victims of a campaign to exterminate foreign black rats during a plague epidemic in 1900, according to new research by scientists who plan to reintroduce ...

Recommended for you

Of bees, mites, and viruses

12 hours ago

Honeybee colonies are dying at alarming rates worldwide. A variety of factors have been proposed to explain their decline, but the exact cause—and how bees can be saved—remains unclear. An article published on August ...

Genetically tracking farmed fish escaping into the wild

Aug 20, 2014

European sea product consumption is on the rise. With overfishing being a threat to the natural balance of the ocean, the alternative is to turn to aquaculture, the industrial production of fish and seafood. ...

France fights back Asian hornet invader

Aug 20, 2014

They slipped into southwest France 10 years ago in a pottery shipment from China and have since invaded more than half the country, which is fighting back with drones, poisoned rods and even chickens.

User comments : 0