Falcons and snakes call Sydney home

May 23, 2011
An ecology survey of Sydney's inner city has found it is home to a variety of wildlife, including peregrine falcons and the dangerous red-bellied black snake.

An ecology survey of Sydney's inner city Monday found it is home to a variety of wildlife, including peregrine falcons and the dangerous red-bellied black snake.

The survey was conducted over three months by ecologists in parks, along foreshores and in other public spaces within the city.

"This is the first time we have ever carried out an ecology survey across the city so the results are extremely important," Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore said.

"The unusual species we found are as important as the ones we didn't find."

The survey recorded a total of five , eight reptile, seven native mammal and about 40 in the centre of the city, including common ringtail possums, tawny frogmouth birds and the threatened green and golden bell frog.

It also revealed a noticeable absence of small birds, which usually rely on dense shrub vegetation for survival.

A total of 360 native plant species were recorded.

The city will use the results to prepare an action plan to help prioritise the conservation of locally indigenous plant and .

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