EU, Japan join forces to improve nuclear safety

May 29, 2011
Japan Prime Minister Naoto Kan gives a joint press conference after the 20th EU-Japan Summit at the EU headquarters in Brussels. Europe and Japan agreed Saturday to join forces in efforts to promote tighter international standards for nuclear safety in the wake of the atomic crisis in Japan.

Europe and Japan agreed Saturday to join forces in efforts to promote tighter international standards for nuclear safety in the wake of the atomic crisis in Japan.

"Going into the future, nuclear safety is a matter of great importance for Japan and the European Union, for the entire world, and for the Earth," Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said after an EU-Japan summit in Brussels.

At the same time, Kan urged the 27-nation EU to ease restrictions on Japanese food imports that were imposed over concerns of potential following the Fukushima power plant accident.

"I have asked for relaxation measures based on scientific evidence," he told a news conference held alongside EU president Herman Van Rompuy and European Commission president Jose Manuel Barroso.

"I have also received a response to that, that the EU also believes any measures should be based on scientific evidence," he said

Last month, EU authorities tightened the acceptable level of radiation in Japanese food imports after the Fukushima , which was sparked by the massive earthquake and tsunami in March that killed 25,000 people.

The EU and Japan also agreed Saturday to cooperate in monitoring the impact of the world's worst since Chernobyl, as well as implementing "comprehensive risk and safety assessments" at plants and encouraging other nations to do the same.

"Radiation does not stop at borders and neither should our collective responsibility. So when we talk nuclear, we talk global," Barroso said.

The Japanese nuclear crisis has prompted the EU to organise "stress tests" on the bloc's 143 nuclear reactors in order to evaluate their ability to survive earthquakes, floods and man-made crises such as plane crashes.

"We want these to go beyond Europe," Barroso said.

Nuclear safety was already high on the agenda of a that Kan attended in Deauville, France, this week, where the leaders of the world's top economies called for stronger nuclear safety rules.

Explore further: Cook farm waste into energy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

EU to mull 'stress tests' for nuclear plants

Mar 15, 2011

The European Union will discuss Tuesday whether to conduct "stress tests" on atomic power plants to check their safety in light of Japan's nuclear crisis, a European Commission spokeswoman said.

EU to test nuclear plants' safety after bargaining

May 25, 2011

The European Union's energy chief said Wednesday he was satisfied with a deal to conduct EU-wide safety checks on nuclear plants even though tests on terror attacks were left for another day.

EU fixes post-Japan nuclear safety overhaul

Mar 25, 2011

European leaders resolved Friday to revisit safety at nuclear reactors as emergency workers in Japan suffered radiation burns and rising global fears of food contamination hit home.

Compromise found in EU nuclear safety testing row

May 13, 2011

European nations split over whether to include the threat of terror attacks in stress tests to be carried out on the continent's reactors have reached a key compromise, diplomats said Friday. ...

Recommended for you

Website shines light on renewable energy resources

1 hour ago

A team from the University of Arizona and eight southwestern electric utility companies have built a pioneering web portal that provides insight into renewable energy sources and how they contribute to the ...

Better software cuts computer energy use

1 hour ago

An EU research project is developing tools to help software engineers create energy-efficient code, which could reduce electricity consumption at data centres by up to 50% and improve battery life in smart ...

Cook farm waste into energy

22 hours ago

It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph.

Developing a reliable wind 'super grid' for Europe

Dec 17, 2014

EU researchers are involved in the development of a pan-European 'super grid' capable of dispersing wind power across Member States. This will bring more renewable energy into homes and businesses, help reduce ...

Boeing 737 factory to move to clean energy

Dec 16, 2014

Boeing said Tuesday it plans to buy renewable energy credits to replace fossil-fuel power at the factory in Washington state where it assembles its 737 commercial airplanes.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet May 29, 2011
Currently the world has around 450 nuclear reactors. That number will have to be increased to 200,000 if all of the worlds energy is to come from nuclear power and everyone uses energy as wastefully as the U.S.
tarheelchief
not rated yet May 30, 2011
I have read in this site of the possible use of Thorium. Is this a suitable substitute for other sources of energy?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.