300-dpi: Epson, E-ink give ePaper a resolution boost

May 18, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- For the most part when we think about E-Ink technology high resolution are not the words that come to mind. We all love our e-readers, such as the Nook and the Kindle, because they give us a library in the palm of our hands. While some of the newer models have color, and higher resolution for images, they are still not the match of a tablet PC for screen quality, but they may be moving in that direction.

Today E Ink and have announced a joint venture that will create a 300-dpi device for ePaper document readers. This will represent a fusion of Epson's high-speed display controller platform and E Ink's ePaper display. The combination of these systems has the potential to create the highest-resolution E-ink system on the market.

The machine, which will have a display size of 9.68 inches on the diagonal, with a resolution of 2,400 x 1,650. This translates to roughly 3.96 million pixels on the display screen. The screen will, as all E-ink devices do, have a thin body and a glare free screen with a very low rate.

Epson will manufacture and sell the E-ink devices, though there has yet to be any word about when the system will be in use or how much the devices will cost. We do know that Epson is going to target the devices to business and educational users where the higher resolution of the screens is not just appreciated but necessary in order to process some of the types of data collected.

Explore further: Intel, SGI test 3M fluids for cooling effects

More information: Epson's press release: global.epson.com/newsroom/2011/news_20110517.html

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