Change is the order of the day in the Arctic

May 11, 2011

Climate change in the Arctic is occurring at a faster and more drastic rate than previously assumed, according to experts attending the AMAP conference in Copenhagen. The latest scientific data show that developments in the Arctic's climate are closely related to developments in the rest of the world.

"The order of the day in the Arctic right now is change. But we shouldn't expect that those changes will be linear in the sense of a little bit each day. We're going to see dramatic changes. If the ice in the Arctic melts it is going to lead to water level problems on a global scale that we all will feel the consequences of," says Associate Dean Katherine Richardson.

The Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) and the universities of Aarhus and Copenhagen organised the Arctic conference, which featured about 400 scientists from 20 countries presenting their scientific data.

Those studies show a worrying state of affairs for the snow, water, ice and in the Arctic.

Changes in climate, due in part to rising temperatures, could wind up being a boon for shipping and open up new areas for mineral and . But, is also an enormous challenge, if not a direct threat, for people living in the arctic and troublesome for the rest of the world.

Danish Foreign Minister Lene Espersen, who was on hand for the final session of the conference on Friday, May 6, will now head to Nuuk, where she will meet with other foreign ministers from Arctic Council states. During the May 12 meeting in the Greenlandic capital, it is expected that attendees will discuss the scientific data presented during the AMAP meeting.

In addition to Denmark, other Arctic Council members include Canada, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the US.

Explore further: NASA balloons begin flying in Antarctica for 2014 campaign

Provided by University of Copenhagen

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omatumr
1 / 5 (2) May 11, 2011
Earth's climate is changing and has always changed because Earth's heat source is a variable star.

As recently reported in Astronomy and Astrophysics:

The variable Sun is the most likely candidate for the natural forcing of past climate changes on time scales of 50 to 1000 years.

http://arxiv.org/...63v1.pdf]http://arxiv.org/...63v1.pdf[/url]

See also: Earth's climate is changing and has always changed because Earth's heat source is a variable star.

As recently reported in Astronomy and Astrophysics:

The variable Sun is the most likely candidate for the natural forcing of past climate changes on time scales of 50 to 1000 years.

http://arxiv.org/...63v1.pdf]http://arxiv.org/...63v1.pdf[/url]

See also:

1. "The Sun - Living with the Stormy Star", National Geographic Magazine, lead report by Curt Suplee (July 2004): http://ngm.nation...dex.html

2."Earth's Heat Source - The Sun", Energy and Environment 20, 131-144 (2009);
http://arxiv.org/pdf/0905.0704

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