Computer program understands the 'that’s what she said' joke

May 02, 2011 by Deborah Braconnier report

(PhysOrg.com) -- While computers can do just about anything these days, having a sense of humor is not something they have been capable of, that is until now. Chloe Kiddon and Yuriy Brun, computer scientists from the University of Washington, have created a software program capable of giving computers a sense of humor and the ability to understand a specific type of double entendre.

The "that's what she said" jokes happen when a simple and innocent sentence can become a dirty joke with the addition of those four little words at the end. The example they used was the sentence "Don't you think these buns are a little too big for this meat?"

In order to create the program, the researchers began by analyzing text, including 1.5 million erotic sentences and 57,000 standard literature sentences. They looked at adjectives, nouns and verbs with high “sexiness” ratings such as “hot” and "meat."

The new system, known as DEviaNT (Double Entendre via Noun Transfer), rates sentences by looking at words that can be interpreted in more than one way and the possibility that they would fit with the “that’s what she said” scenario.

Using jokes they had gathered from online websites, they trained DEviaNT and received around 72% accuracy, though they believe they could increase that to 99.5%. They plan to present DEviaNT at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics in June and plan to continue their work and expand DEviaNT's joking ability.

Explore further: A new kind of data-driven predictive methodology

More information: Conference paper: THAT'S WHAT SHE SAID: DOUBLE ENTENDRE IDENTIFICATION, by Chloe Kiddon and Yuriy Brun: www.acl2011.org/accepted_papers.shtml

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LariAnn
3.7 / 5 (3) May 02, 2011
I see the future, a "HumorComputor" that will generate jokes by the millions (billions?) using a sophisticated humorithm and provide endless material for stand-up comics and the future robotic community to use on human audiences. Ah, the marvel of high(ly funny) technology!
emsquared
5 / 5 (1) May 02, 2011
I see the future, a "HumorComputor" that will generate jokes by the millions (billions?) using a sophisticated humorithm and provide endless material for stand-up comics and the future robotic community to use on human audiences. Ah, the marvel of high(ly funny) technology!

I'll stick to my manitees and idea balls, thank you.
Norezar
5 / 5 (1) May 02, 2011
No "yo momma" jokes?

:(
lexington
2 / 5 (3) May 02, 2011
That's what she said!
pubwvj
not rated yet May 02, 2011
But I don't understand the joke.
Fig1024
5 / 5 (2) May 02, 2011
pubwvj, I'm sure in the future they will have brain implants with interface to computer, which could run an auxiliary sense of humor block.
NickFun
5 / 5 (1) May 02, 2011
However, the computer does not realize that the exact opposite can also be funny. "Don't you think these buns are a little too big for this meat?" and I replied "That's NOT what she said". Does the computer realize the negation of a double entendre is also funny?
rynox
not rated yet May 02, 2011
Silly project, but kind of neat for a computer to be able to process complex language. It's really hard.
rushty
5 / 5 (3) May 03, 2011
It's really hard.


That's what she said
IngDutch
not rated yet May 03, 2011
I see the future, a "HumorComputor" that will generate jokes by the millions (billions?) using a sophisticated humorithm and provide endless material for stand-up comics and the future robotic community to use on human audiences. Ah, the marvel of high(ly funny) technology!


haha. humor bot 5.0 :D from Futurama comes to mind. :P
TAz00
5 / 5 (1) May 03, 2011
Finally! The worlds' deadliest joke can be created and weaponized
rgwalther
not rated yet May 03, 2011
However, the computer does not realize that the exact opposite can also be funny. "Don't you think these buns are a little too big for this meat?" and I replied "That's NOT what she said". Does the computer realize the negation of a double entendre is also funny?


More importantly, does the woman?
rynox
not rated yet May 03, 2011
It's really hard.


That's what she said

I'm so glad someone picked up on the setup. I really softballed it in there.