China doubles solar power target by 2020: report

May 06, 2011
Residents are seen walking past a line of solar power panels in Shenyang, in northeast China's Liaoning province. China has more than doubled its target for solar power capacity to 50 gigawatts by 2020, state media said, as the world's largest polluter steps up efforts to boost clean energy sources.

China has more than doubled its target for solar power capacity to 50 gigawatts by 2020, state media said, as the world's largest polluter steps up efforts to boost clean energy sources.

The increased target follows a massive earthquake and tsunami in Japan that triggered a nuclear crisis in the country's northeast and fuelled worldwide debate about the safety of .

China hopes its installed solar power capacity will reach 10 gigawatts by 2015 and 50 by the end of the decade, the Shanghai Securities News said, citing Li Junfeng, deputy director of the energy research arm of the National Development and Reform Commission.

The country's current installed capacity is less than one gigawatt, the official China Daily said last month.

Li said China will soon publish a five-year blueprint and other supportive policies for the solar power industry.

Officials at the NDRC, China's top economic planning agency, were not immediately available to comment.

Beijing has ordered safety inspections of the country's and "temporarily" suspended approval of new and proposed projects following the disasters in Japan, but has said it will continue to develop the technology.

-- which in November admitted it is the world's biggest emitter -- has some of the globe's worst air and water quality after three decades of unrestrained growth and resulting pollution.

Leaders of the world's second-largest economy plan to invest hundreds of billions of dollars developing clean energy over the next decade as it seeks to meet a target of generating 15 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2020.

It currently relies on carbon-belching coal for 70 percent of its energy needs.

Explore further: Researchers achieve 'holy grail' of battery design: A stable lithium anode

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

China to be 3rd biggest wind power producer: media

Jan 01, 2010

China is set to become the world's third largest wind power producer in 2009, state media reported, as the Asian giant seeks various ways to expand energy supply to power its economic boom.

China triples wind power capacity goal: report

May 04, 2009

China has more than tripled its target for wind power capacity to 100 gigawatts by 2020, likely making it the world's fastest growing market for wind energy technology, state press said.

China harnesses mountain wind power

Nov 22, 2009

In the mountains above the southwestern Chinese town of Dali, dozens of new wind turbines dot the landscape -- a symbol of the country's sky-high ambitions for clean, green energy.

Recommended for you

Turning bio-waste into hydrogen

1 hour ago

Whilst hydrogen cars look set to be the next big thing in an increasingly carbon footprint-aware society, sustainable methods to produce hydrogen are still in their early stages. The HYTIME project is working on a novel production ...

Economical and agile offshore construction ship

Jul 25, 2014

Siemens is currently installing the power supply and propulsion systems into a new multi-purpose offshore construction ship for Toisa Ltd. The ship, which is being built by the Korean company Hyundai Heavy ...

User comments : 7

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

DarwiN100
4.7 / 5 (3) May 06, 2011
Go China. Show us the way..
NotParker
1 / 5 (4) May 06, 2011
70% of electricity from coal. That is the way to cheap power.

All those jobs in the US lost so China could burn vast quantities of coal.

Thanks green terrorists.
Jimee
not rated yet May 07, 2011
Oh, please let us poison our children and our world for another 300 years, please? Ever been to China? We have had a few hundred years to learn that blatant poisoning of our citizens and our country are not sustainable. China is working against the odds, but they are rising. Coal may seem like cheap power, but that is because the costs of its toxic effects are subsidized by our taxes and innocent lives. Sustainable energy will cut out those who cannot shift their greed to another energy paradigm.
NotParker
1 / 5 (1) May 08, 2011
Mining rare earth metals is a filthy business in China, but rare eraths magnets are essential to wind turbines ... which rarely work as advertised.
Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet May 08, 2011
Mining rare earth metals is a filthy business in China, but rare eraths magnets are essential to wind turbines ... which rarely work as advertised.


Um...

Both wind turbines and hydro turbines work according to the exact same basic formula, and the generators use the exact same basic technology. There is more energy density in hydro than in wind, but the technology is functionally identical, except with wind you don't need to build and maintain an expensive, environment-killing megastructure to benefit from the turbine.

You still need rare earth metals to make the generators for ANY power planet, whether wind, hydro, coal, nuclear, or solar boiler; the generators are all the same in any case, with only minor changes in specifications. I guess you didn't think of that one...

In a coal, gas, or nuclear plant, you pay for the turbine and then you pay for the cost of fuel, labor and maintenance.

In a wind farm you pay for the turbine and then watch it work for free...
NotParker
1 / 5 (1) May 09, 2011
The Hoover dam only has 17 turbines. Most of them were installed by 1961 - about 10 years before rare earth magnets were invented.

Rare Earth magnets are expensive and only necessary when weight is a factor. Weight is not a fact when the turbine sits on the ground.

In a wind farm you pay for the turbine and then watch it work for free...


Which is does 10 - 20% of the time. Hydro turbines work all the time.
Jmaximus
not rated yet May 28, 2011
Funny how people say 'oh solar will never be good enough to power the whole country', I don't seem to recall nuclear or coal providing 100% either.