Cells derived from different stem cells: Same or different?

May 02, 2011

There are two types of stem cell considered promising sources of cells for regenerative therapies: ES and iPS cells. Recent data indicate these cells are molecularly different, raising the possibility that cells derived from the two sources could be distinct. New research, however, has determined that there is considerable overlap in the genetic programs of thyroid, lung, liver, and pancreas progenitors derived from ES and iPS cells and these progenitors isolated from mouse embryos.

Stem cells are considered by many to be promising candidate sources of cells for therapies to regenerate and repair diseased tissues. There are two types of stem cell considered in this context: embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are derived from early embryos; and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are derived by reprogramming cells of the body such that they have the ability to generate any cell type. Recent data indicate that ES and iPS cells are molecularly different, raising the possibility that cells derived from these two sources could be distinct.

A team of researchers, led by Darrell Kotton and Gustavo Mostoslavsky, at Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, has now, however, determined that mouse iPS and parental ES cells show highly similar capacity to be differentiated in vitro into definitive endoderm progenitors — the cells from which , lung, liver, and are derived. Importantly, there was considerable overlap between the genetic programs of definitive endoderm derived from ES and iPS cells in vitro and definitive endoderm isolated from mouse embryos. The authors therefore conclude that their data support the notion that iPS cells could be used for the development of cell-based therapies for diseased endoderm-derived tissues.

Explore further: Researchers capture picture of microRNA in action

More information: View this article at: www.jci.org/articles/view/4385… 1acccf69de7b78a41298

Provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers generate functional neurons from somatic cells

Feb 24, 2009

In a new study, researchers were able to generate functionally mature motor neurons from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are engineered from adult somatic cells and can differentiate into most other cell types. ...

Recommended for you

Researchers capture picture of microRNA in action

Oct 30, 2014

Biologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have described the atomic-level workings of "microRNA" molecules, which control the expression of genes in all animals and plants.

Blocking a fork in the road to DNA replication

Oct 30, 2014

A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has discovered the surprising manner in which an enigmatic protein known as SUUR acts to control gene copy number during DNA replication. It's a finding that could shed new light on ...

Cell division, minus the cells

Oct 30, 2014

(Phys.org) —The process of cell division is central to life. The last stage, when two daughter cells split from each other, has fascinated scientists since the dawn of cell biology in the Victorian era. ...

A new method simplifies the analysis of RNA structure

Oct 30, 2014

To understand the function of an RNA molecule, similar to the better-known DNA and vital for cell metabolism, we need to know its three-dimensional structure. Unfortunately, establishing the shape of an RNA ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.