Biological diversity: Exploiters and exploited

May 03, 2011

From the crops we farm to the insects which blight them mankind has always had a complex relationship with nature, commanding some species while falling victim to others. In Biological Diversity: Exploiters and Exploited Paul Hatcher and Nick Battey explore the subject of biodiversity through the species that humans exploit, and the species which exploit humans.

The authors selected 18 such organisms and have used them as a framework to discuss the species, their interactions with humans and each other. Species range from the organisms man exploits, such as honey bees, the silkworm, sugar cane and the vine, to species which exploit us, malaria, plague, locusts and the wolf.

Each species has been chosen for their ability to best illustrate particular biological principles and for their strong interaction with other species. While linked, each chapter forms a stand-alone essay with text boxes highlighting important issues and concepts. In addition to tables and figures the book has a selection of original illustrations drawn by leading artist Steven Appleby.

Using this case-based framework : Exploiters and Exploited explores the important biological principles and concepts that underpin the diversity of life and the interrelationship of humans with other groups of organisms in a careful synthesis of science and history.

Biodiversity is becoming an increasingly important subject, often forming compulsory modules for biology students, while becoming a popular option for , biogeography and ecology students. This title ensures that students and researchers are not only introduced to a fresh approach to understanding biodiversity but have a constant reminder of mankind's place within it.

Explore further: Decrease of genetic diversity in the endangered Saimaa ringed seal continues

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