Amazon selling more Kindle books than print books

May 19, 2011
Members of the media are given a demonstration of the Kindle electronic reader in New York City in 2009. Online retail giant Amazon said Thursday that sales of digital books for the Kindle have surpassed sales of print books.

Online retail giant Amazon said Thursday that sales of digital books for the Kindle electronic reader have surpassed sales of print books.

"Customers are now choosing Kindle books more often than print books," Amazon founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos said in a statement.

"We had high hopes that this would happen eventually, but we never imagined it would happen this quickly," Bezos said. "We've been selling print books for 15 years and Kindle books for less than four years."

The Seattle, Washington-based Amazon said that since April 1, it was selling 105 Kindle for every 100 print books, hardcover and paperback combined.

The company said it had sold more than three times as many Kindle books so far in 2011 as it did during the same period last year.

Amazon began selling print books in July 1995 and introduced the Kindle in November 2007.

The US Kindle store offers more than 950,000 books including 109 of the 111 New York Times best sellers.

Amazon does not release sales figures for the Kindle .

Explore further: Glass maker deals to exit Apple, Arizona plant

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Amazon offers to replace Orwell books on Kindles

Sep 04, 2009

(AP) -- Amazon.com Inc. is offering free books or $30 to Kindle customers whose copies of the George Orwell novels "1984" and "Animal Farm" were deleted from their electronic reading devices in July.

Recommended for you

NBCUniversal settles with unpaid interns for $6.4M

1 hour ago

NBCUniversal will pay $6.4 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by unpaid interns who worked on "Saturday Night Live" and other shows who claim they are owed wages, according to court documents.

States ascend into the cloud

2 hours ago

Seven years ago, the state of Delaware started moving computer servers out of closets and from under workers' desks to create a consolidated data center and a virtual computing climate.

Microsoft drops Nokia name from smartphones

4 hours ago

Microsoft said Friday it was dropping the Nokia name from its Lumia smartphones, rebranding following the acquisition earlier this year of the Finnish group's handset division.

Amazon's loss makes holidays a question mark

4 hours ago

Amazon's trademark smile icon is becoming more of a grimace. The world's largest online retailer reported a wider third-quarter loss than analysts expected and gave a disappointing holiday forecast.

Ericsson profit down 10 pct despite higher sales

9 hours ago

Wireless equipment maker Ericsson says its third-quarter earnings slumped 10 percent despite higher sales due to increased operating costs and negative effects from currency hedging.

User comments : 0