How do we fight the war against cyber terrorism?

Apr 11, 2011

The Internet has no borders, no universal legislation, and although highly social and distributed is not represented by cooperation across the globe. Given those characteristics how might nations make their plans for counter terrorism in cyberspace as active online as they are in the everyday world? A collaboration between researchers in the US and Iran hoped to address that issue and its findings are published this month in the International Journal of Internet Technology and Secured Transactions.

Incidence of online crime has grown considerably in recent years, with terms such as malware, Trojans, bot-nets and phishing attacks entering the common vernacular. There has also been a significant increase in activity that might at best be described as international commercial sabotage but that some would label more sensationally as cyber-terrrorism. Much of the illicit activity that leads to internet outages, malware infections and other virtual atrocities are being carried out with purely criminal intent. However, there are alleged attacks orchestrated by whole nations against other countries, corporations and organizations that might truly be described more accurately as a form of terrorism.

Arash Barfar from the University of South Florida in Tampa and Kiyana Zolfaghar and her colleague from the KN Toosi University of Technology in Tehran, suggest that the first step that must be taken to surmount the barriers of failed cooperation and legislation is to organize national efforts to use "web mining" techniques and "honeypots" to wheedle out cyber-terrorists before they attack.

"The internet is a very important channel not only for communication, but also for searching information and for doing business, the pattern of counter terrorism should efficiently reflect that," the team says. They have now developed a framework that would allow leaders to develop and use the necessary tools to trace cyber terrorists effectively in real-time and to make arrests before any potentially debilitating attack were to take place.

Explore further: Showing 'The Interview' is part of Google's long-term YouTube plan

More information: "A framework for cyber war against international terrorism" in Internet Technology and Secured Transactions, 2011, 3, 29-39

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

2007 looks like year of 'malware'

Sep 18, 2007

The problem of malicious software or malware appears to be getting exponentially worse. So far this year, IBM Internet Security Systems (ISS) X-Force research and development team has identified more than 210,000 new malware ...

More targeted cyber attacks likely in 2006

Jan 23, 2006

The latest security report from IBM foresees cybercrime evolving from pervasive global outbreaks to smaller, stealthier attacks targeted at specific organizations for extortion purposes. IBM Global Business Security Index ...

Iran launches cyber crime unit: police

Jan 24, 2011

Iran on Sunday officially launched its cyber police unit to confront Internet crimes and counter social networks that spread "espionage and riots," police chief Esmaeil Ahmadi Moghaddam said.

Recommended for you

N. Korea suffers another Internet shutdown

8 hours ago

North Korea suffered an Internet shutdown for at least two hours on Saturday, Chinese state-media and cyber experts said, after Pyongyang blamed Washington for an online blackout earlier this week.

Streaming release of 'Interview' test for industry

Dec 25, 2014

Sony's "The Interview" has been a hacking target, a punchline and a political lightning rod. Now, with its release online at the same time it debuts in theaters, it has a new role: a test for a new kind of ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

COCO
5 / 5 (1) Apr 12, 2011
is Stuxnet in the mix here?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.