Transocean claims record sea depth for oil drilling

Apr 12, 2011
Offshore oil drilling group Transocean claimed Tuesday that it had a set a world record for deep water drilling at an ocean depth of 3,107 metres (10,194 feet) off the coast of India.

Offshore oil drilling group Transocean claimed Tuesday that it had a set a world record for deep water drilling at an ocean depth of 3,107 metres (10,194 feet) off the coast of India.

The depth was achieved by the ultra-deepwater drillship Dhirubhai Deepwater KG2, surpassing the previous record of 10,011 feet, also set by Transocean in 2003 in the Gulf of Mexico, the group said in a statement.

It set "what the company believes is a world record for the deepest water depth by an offshore drilling rig of 10,194 feet of water while working for Reliance Industries offshore India."

Transocean owned the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon rig that exploded last year in the , killing 11 rig workers and triggering a huge spill along the southern US coast.

The disaster also highlighted the growing exploitation of hard to reach and costly fields beneath on the , driven by dwindling resources and higher oil prices.

By comparison North Sea fields have been largely exploited at water depths of around 100 metres.

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rgwalther
not rated yet Apr 12, 2011
3,107 meters as compared to 100 meters? I hate to be a paranoid, but that(w/o considering pressure et al) means there is 30 times more pipe that is subject to failure. Not to mention the chance of unleashing all those weird Hindu gods.
Shelgeyr
1 / 5 (1) Apr 13, 2011
I think this is rather good evidence in favor of petroleum being abiogenic. Isn't this a bit outside the "oil window"?