Tornadoes whipped up by wind, not climate: officials

Apr 28, 2011 by Guillaume Decamme
In the aftermath of a severe tornado, owner Frank Evans stands on the rubble that was the Quik Pawn Shop in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. US meteorologists warned Thursday it would be a mistake to blame climate change for a seeming increase in tornadoes in the wake of deadly storms that have ripped through the US south.

US meteorologists warned Thursday it would be a mistake to blame climate change for a seeming increase in tornadoes in the wake of deadly storms that have ripped through the US south.

"If you look at the past 60 years of data, the number of is increasing significantly, but it's agreed upon by the tornado community that it's not a real increase," said Grady Dixon, assistant professor of meteorology and climatology at Mississippi State University.

"It's having to do with better (weather tracking) technology, more population, the fact that the population is better educated and more aware. So we're seeing them more often," Dixon said.

But he said it would be "a terrible mistake" to relate the up-tick to .

The tornadoes that ripped through the US south this week killed over 250 people, in the worst US weather disaster in years, with residents and emergency workers sifting through the rubble on Thursday.

Violent twisters that famously rip through the US south's "Tornado Alley" are formed when strong jet winds bringing upper-level storms from the north interact with very warm, humid air mass from the , said David Imy from the NOAA Storm Prediction Center in Norma, Oklahoma.

On Wednesday, a particularly potent storm was whipping up around the heart of that tornado-prone corridor where the states of Arkansas, Oklahoma, eastern Texas and northwest Louisiana meet, noted Kristina Pydynowski, a senior at the AccuWeather.com website.

Sparking the severe thunderstorms from that point was the much warmer air arriving from the south, over the tropical Gulf. The combining winds at differing altitudes, said Pydynowski, created "significant twisting motion in the atmosphere, allowing the strongest thunderstorms to spawn tornadoes."

Such a mixture would not be prevalent along the US eastern seaboard, so rough weather in that region Thursday would not also spawn tornadoes, at least on the same scale, she said.

Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), also dismissed Thursday climate change as a factor in the deadly tornadoes: "Actually what we're seeing is springtime," he said.

"Many people think of Oklahoma as 'Tornado Alley' and forget that the southeast United States actually has a history of longer and more powerful tornadoes that stay on the ground longer."

Wednesday's deadly tornadoes, according to Imy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, were unusual for being "long track," meaning they were on the ground for a longer period of time than usual -- in this case, roiling across the land for 30 miles (48 kilometers) or more.

An average track would be less than five miles, said Imy.

However, the stronger-than-usual tornadoes affecting the southern states were actually predicted from examining the planet's climatological patterns, specifically those related to the La Nina phenomenon.

"We knew it was going to be a big tornado year," he said. But the key to that tip-off was unrelated to climate change: "It is related to the natural fluctuations of the planet."

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kaasinees
3 / 5 (4) Apr 28, 2011
lmao. This whole article is a contradiction. TORNADOS ARE PART OF THE CLIMATE.

I lost "faith" in physorg a long time ago.

Wikipedia:
Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count and other meteorological elemental measurements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements and their variations over shorter time periods.
kivahut
1 / 5 (1) Apr 28, 2011
I'm loving Climate Change.
dnatwork
5 / 5 (3) Apr 28, 2011
So where does the large mass of warm, humid air come from? A warm ocean, no?
6_6
3 / 5 (2) Apr 29, 2011
a previous article indicated scientists acknowledged that global wind was increasing due to climate change....
@vendicar has nothing to do with God.. you can blame humans for their own lack of respect for the planet.
Moebius
2.3 / 5 (3) Apr 29, 2011
BS, it is climate, they are increasing and they are getting stronger.
Moebius
3 / 5 (2) Apr 29, 2011
America is feeling the punishing wrath of God.

The Christian God is an Angry God.

He is probably angered by Gays in the American Military. He only want's good Christian's in his army. Homo's are the hand work of Lucifer.



I'm sure you would like to bring about the apocalypse if you could so your sick beliefs would be fulfilled? If there is an afterlife you have a big surprise coming. If there is any punishment for what we do in life, you are as likely to be on the receiving end as many truly evil people are. Just because you think you are good doesn't mean you actually are. You are loading up with karma and if there's any justice in the afterlife you are going to pay for it.
Javinator
not rated yet Apr 29, 2011
Vendicar is being facetious. It will be okay.
Shootist
1 / 5 (1) Apr 29, 2011
lmao. This whole article is a contradiction. TORNADOS (sic) ARE PART OF THE CLIMATE.


No. Tornadoes are part of the weather.
SoonerNation
not rated yet Apr 29, 2011
It's ok Shootist, they quoted Wikipedia!
weatherhappens
1 / 5 (2) Apr 30, 2011
@MOEBIUS Maybe you should go check history and you will find that 1974 was similar in respect to tornadoes, but there I go confusing you with something you and your altar boys at The First Church of Climate Change would rather evade. In 1974 they were predicting the next ice age. Of course you fail to mention that the ocean temp has been decreasing for some time, the Arctic ice is expanding, the atmospheric temp has been dropping, and sea level rise is currently static. But that doesn't fit the alarmist screed, so you'll ignore it.
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (4) May 01, 2011
"Arctic ice is expanding" - liar

http://arctic.atm...ctic.png
GSwift7
1 / 5 (1) May 02, 2011
BS, it is climate, they are increasing and they are getting stronger


The following article has a nice summary of the truth. If you want to argue with the data then feel free I guess, but it's NOAA and the other big guys who say that if climate change is related to storm frequency here in the US then it seems to be causeing a decline, not an increase of any kind:

http://dailycalle...herwise/

ryggesogn2
2.3 / 5 (3) May 02, 2011
BS, it is climate, they are increasing and they are getting stronger.

How do you know?
Data on tornados are quite limited as doppler radar that can measure tornadic activity is quite new. Tornados can and do touchdown with no witnesses.
GSwift7
1 / 5 (1) May 03, 2011
Data on tornados are quite limited as doppler radar that can measure tornadic activity is quite new. Tornados can and do touchdown with no witnesses


Yes, exactly. Same thing with hurricaines. We get a lot more accurate count these days than we used to. In addition to tornados going unreported in the past, they also used to get instances where one tornado could get reported multiple times in different places. Just having more accurate time-keeping, so that all of the clocks are synchronized, has helped to get more accurate reporting. In the past, if the same tornado was spotted by two different people and their clocks were different by some amount of time, then you couldn't know if it was the same tornado or not.
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (1) May 03, 2011
"There's never been another tornado like it. The 1925 Tri-State Tornado rode a straight-line path for 3.5 hours across 219 miles of Missouri, southern Illinois and Indiana, making it the longest single tornado track anywhere in the world.

Read more: Tri-State Tornado: Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, March 1925 - Popular Mechanics

http://en.wikiped...Pre-1900

Of course these are the tornadoes that hit population centers and could be documented. How many were not documented?

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