Thousands march against nuclear power in Japan

Apr 24, 2011
Women protest against Japan's nuclear policy during a parade for the Earth Day in Tokyo. Organisers estimate that 5,000 took part in the march, demanding an end to nuclear power in Japan and a switch to alternative energy after the crisis at an atomic plant hit by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

Thousands of people marched in Tokyo on Sunday to demand an end to nuclear power in Japan and a switch to alternative energy after the crisis at an atomic plant hit by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

Brandishing placards bearing the slogan: "Bye Bye Genpatsu" (Goodbye Nuclear Power), demonstrators -- including many young people and families -- walked along a route from Yoyogi Park in the centre of the capital.

Organisers estimated 5,000 took part.

"We are worried. Before Fukushima, I wasn't thinking about it but now we must act, we must do it for our children," said Hiroshi Iino, 43, who joined the "Energy shift parade" with his wife and two boys, aged five and nine.

Schoolteacher Yoko Onuma, 48, said she was demonstrating for the second time since the accident at the Daiichi plant where radiation leaks have forced the evacuation of some 80,000 people within 20 kilometres (13 miles) of the site.

"Before, I wasn't aware of the dangers of nuclear power," she said.

"But now we have to mobilise many people, as has happened in other countries, such as Germany."

Women protest against Japan's nuclear policy during a parade for the Earth Day in Tokyo. Organisers estimate that 5,000 took part in the march, demanding an end to nuclear power in Japan and a switch to alternative energy after the crisis at an atomic plant hit by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

Japan director Junichi Sato, one of the organisers of the protest, said until now few had protested about nuclear power following the quake-tsunami disaster which left more than 26,000 dead or missing.

"Over the past month, everybody was focusing on the victims of the tsunami ... on how to end the crisis," Sato said.

"Outside (in other countries), they jumped directly on the energy issue," he said. "But mobilisation is going to increase in Japan."

Around 2,000 people took part in a separate anti-nuclear demonstration under the slogan "Anti-TEPCO," referring to the operator of the atomic plant, held simultaneously a few kilometres away at Shiba Park.

The issue of possibly phasing out nuclear power is now openly debated on the political scene in Japan.

"We cannot do without , but we have to think about the way nuclear plants are built and the speed of their construction," Katsuya Okada, secretary general of the ruling centre-left Democratic Party of Japan, said Friday.

Before the tsunami which led to the shutdown of a dozen reactors, nearly 30 percent of Japan's electricity was generated from nuclear power.

Resource-poor Japan is highly dependent on Middle Eastern oil but its high-tech companies are also world leaders in many environmental and energy-saving technologies.

Explore further: Exploring environmental impacts of solar technologies

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User comments : 8

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rgwalther
3.3 / 5 (4) Apr 25, 2011
If Nuclear Power is so dangerous, Why are they able to 'march'. Shouldn't they be dead, or at least crawling?
dan42day
3 / 5 (3) Apr 25, 2011
Brandishing placards bearing the slogan: "Bye Bye Genpatsu" (Goodbye Nuclear Power),


Thanks for the translation, I assumed "Genpatsu" had something to do with nuclear power, but the "Bye Bye" had me stumped!
Kingsix
3 / 5 (1) Apr 25, 2011
"We are worried. Before Fukushima, I wasn't thinking about it but now we must act, we must do it for our children,"

Usually I would label this as a typical laymen overreaction, however, I do think that there is some merit in this. I don't think that nuclear power is overly dangerous, I am sure there are 100 other things around Japan that if release could cause just as much of a problem, I'm thinking mostly about the chemicals used to make the parts in our wonderful gadgets.
However, nuclear power should probably be used in places that aren't prone to large natural disasters. That or nuclear reactors in these areas should be built much safer (failsafe) than they are.
6_6
1 / 5 (1) Apr 25, 2011
Nuclear_anything_ never was, or is, or ever will be safe. it's the asbestos of the energy world. 50 years from now it will be humbling to remember.
Modernmystic
1 / 5 (1) Apr 25, 2011
Nuclear_anything_ never was, or is, or ever will be safe. it's the asbestos of the energy world. 50 years from now it will be humbling to remember.


Ever get an X-Ray? How about a CT scan? How about an education, ever have one of those?
Silver_the_Fox
not rated yet Apr 25, 2011
Again with the vicious comments, what are you? 15?
Great, no you have me doing it, thanks alot Mystic. but 6_6, he has a point about how your view is anti-progressional at best.

Nuclear_anything_ never was, or is, or ever will be safe. it's the asbestos of the energy world. 50 years from now it will be humbling to remember


really? I don't think so. The only reason that the meltdown happened was do to an act of God (the Tsunami), I say God because an act of nature is defined as anything brought about by circumstances that can not be forseen nor stopped, an Act of God.

Any questions?
Silver out.
Modernmystic
1 / 5 (1) Apr 25, 2011
Again with the vicious comments, what are you? 15?


LOL I guess your definition of vicious and mine are radically different...

How about you just do you level best to ignore any further "viciousness" from me, you'll be happier and so will I :)
Silver_the_Fox
not rated yet Apr 26, 2011
Well, at least you have a sense of humor... very well, so be it, Blog well

Silver out.