Sex predator-nabbing US hacker sentenced to prison

April 15, 2011
A US Internet vigilante who created a computer virus to attack media outlets publishing embarrassing articles about him was sentenced Friday to two years in prison.

A US Internet vigilante who created a computer virus to attack media outlets publishing embarrassing articles about him was sentenced Friday to two years in prison.

Bruce Raisley, 48, was found guilty in federal court in Camden, New Jersey, last September of creating a designed to cause damage to Internet sites.

The unusual case began when the computer programmer fell out with former colleagues at an NBC television show called "To Catch a Predator," which featured the organization Perverted Justice in its attempts to uncover pedophiles.

The group's founder embarrassed Raisley by luring him in a faked online romance to leave his wife for a fictitious woman named "Holly."

The episode was picked up in two media articles, including one in Rolling Stone, which examined the sting against Raisley and the work of Perverted Justice in general.

Raisley then fought back by creating a "botnet" of some 100,000 virus-infected computers which attacked any website posting one of the two articles mentioning his case. The virus created attacks, shutting down those websites.

"In total, those websites suffered damages in excess of $100,000 in lost revenues and mitigation," the US attorney's office for New Jersey said.

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Royale
4.5 / 5 (4) Apr 15, 2011
What, exactly then is the correct way to fight back when you're getting smeared all over the media? Litigation would have cost him well over $100,000 and writing code is free (not counting his time spent). I'd love to read about the actual code somewhere. Anyone know of a place to find an explanation of the code? (Since I doubt the actual code is readily available).
kaasinees
3.3 / 5 (4) Apr 15, 2011
How did they prove they lost 100 G's?
Skepticus
5 / 5 (4) Apr 15, 2011
How did they prove they lost 100 G's?


By spending 200G on lawyers, as usual. That's how justice works.
CarolinaScotsman
4.5 / 5 (2) Apr 15, 2011
The group's founder embarrassed Raisley by luring him in a faked online romance to leave his wife for a fictitious woman named "Holly."


Sounds as if the group's founder is guilty of fraud and could be sued in civil court as well as being criminally charged.

kevinrtrs
1.2 / 5 (6) Apr 16, 2011
Interesting how one's life gets complicated when disobeying one of God's commandments: Do not commit adultery.
In this case Mr Raisley would have been better off staying away from the online attractions of the so-called Holly in the first place. Of course, even after the fact if he'd acknowledged his own complicity in the matter and simply accepted the result of his folly he would still have been better off.

Unfortunately he allowed his feelings of anger and a need for revenge to get the better of him.

The group leader was using duplicitous means to lure him to his fall, so if he rather directed his anger there in the first place, he would have had a better result.

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