Russian cosmologist suggests life could exist inside a black hole

Apr 13, 2011 by Bob Yirka report
The stable periodic orbits of photon and planet. See http://arxiv.org/abs/1103.6140

(PhysOrg.com) -- Going out on a limb, Russian cosmologist Vyacheslav Dokuchaev, of the Institute for Nuclear Research at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, has speculated in a paper published in arXiv, that due to the very unique conditions that exist past the event horizon in certain (charged and rotating) black holes, life could very possibly exist, and could very well have evolved into advanced civilizations.

Black holes, as we all know, are entities that exist in space that have such strong that everything around them gets sucked in and swallowed up, never to be seen again. Well, not exactly, scientists know that deep inside rotating, charged , past the (the point where time and space become one) things switch back to what would be considered normal (the Cauchy horizon) at least to the extent that photons can orbit the singularity. And it’s the existence of these photons that leads Dokuchaev to believe that other objects could conceivably exist as well, some of which could possibly harbor life forms; albeit their world would be radically different from what we know due to the presence of dramatic amounts of light from the photons that would also be trapped orbiting the singularity with them, not to mention constantly fluctuating tidal forces and bombardment by other energy sources.

Dokuchaev, whose field is the study of the orbiting entities that do actually exist within the small subset of black holes, known as charged rotating black holes, as opposed to the Schwarzschild black hole (no movement) or Kerr black hole (no charge), clearly realizes that though his proclamations might be a bit extravagant, his science is clearly not. His theories expand on previous research that has shown that elementary light particles (photons) have been found to orbit the in such black holes, in stable, periodic orbits. He asserts that there is no evidence to suggest that something larger, such as a planet with complicated chemistry could not do the same.

Of course, if what Dokuchaev suggests is true, we’d almost certainly never know about it due to the impossibility of emissions from any such advanced escaping the immense gravity of the black hole in which they live; so the argument is rather moot, though certainly intriguing.

Explore further: Lucky star escapes black hole with minor damage

More information: Is there life inside black holes? by Vyacheslav I. Dokuchaev, arXiv:1103.6140v2 [gr-qc] arxiv.org/abs/1103.6140
via Technology Review

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Answers to black hole evolution beyond the horizon?

Jan 19, 2011

One of the most important predictions of Einstein's theory of General Relativity is the existence of black holes. The dynamics of these systems are not yet fully understood, but researchers from Queen Mary, ...

Astronomers calculate mass of largest black hole yet

Jan 14, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Weighing 6.6 billion solar masses, the black hole at the center of galaxy M87 is the most massive black hole for which a precise mass has been measured. Using the Frederick C. Gillett Gemini ...

The Edge of a Black Hole

Aug 18, 2009

The existence of black holes is one of the most amazing and bizarre predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity. Despite his original misgivings about their reality, massive black hole holes are today believed ...

How do supermassive black holes get so big?

Apr 26, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- At the center of most galaxies lie supermassive black holes that can grow to become more than a billion times larger than our Sun. However, astrophysicists don’t fully understand the formation ...

Recommended for you

New window on the early Universe

Oct 22, 2014

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for astrophysicists after hatching a new observational strategy to distill detailed information from galaxies at the edge of ...

Chandra's archives come to life

Oct 22, 2014

Every year, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory looks at hundreds of objects throughout space to help expand our understanding of the Universe. Ultimately, these data are stored in the Chandra Data Archive, ...

User comments : 8

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

eachus
4.7 / 5 (3) Apr 13, 2011
Interesting but the headline is misleading. Stellar mass and smaller black holes have these (potentially weird) rules inside. Larger black holes are unlikely to have significant charge, and for supermassive black holes, even the maximum possible rotation is unlikely to be significant inside.

Of course, there is the limiting case that our universe may be considered as a black hole. Then the possibility of life is axiomatic. (But not the type of life Vyacheslav Dokuchaev is suggesting.)
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (6) Apr 13, 2011
Wow...

You can actually get paid in the "scientific community" for making a completely pointless theory like this, but can't get paid for actually trying to solve real world problems that actually matter to people...
frajo
5 / 5 (5) Apr 13, 2011
You can actually get paid in the "scientific community" for making a completely pointless theory like this
Yes. It's called research in theoretical physics.
but can't get paid for actually trying to solve real world problems that actually matter to people...
That's called engineering. A good engineer does not necessarily need to understand theoretical physics.
Cave_Man
5 / 5 (4) Apr 13, 2011
You can actually get paid in the "scientific community" for making a completely pointless theory like this
Yes. It's called research in theoretical physics.
but can't get paid for actually trying to solve real world problems that actually matter to people...
That's called engineering. A good engineer does not necessarily need to understand theoretical physics.

All hes trying to say is wheres my nuclear fusion powered jacuzzi hot tub already ffs its taking them long enough.
Tachyon8491
1 / 5 (2) Apr 13, 2011
I am aware of several black holes with a form of life inside them here on this planet who can be found sitting behind imposing walnut desks and deflect other lives with dramatic gravitational forces.

Seriously, I think the theoretical thinking here has it wrong from the moment of formation of black holes - the origin of exobiotic molecules e.g. as accepted in Type II carbonaceous chondrites and observed in large molecular clouds (LMCs) as also protostellar envelopes, and which may be assumed to be a primary evolutionary phase of phylogeny, I think is very unlikely to originate and evolve beyond an event-horizon.
PinkElephant
5 / 5 (4) Apr 13, 2011
He asserts that there is no evidence to suggest that something larger, such as a planet with complicated chemistry could not do the same.
Yeeeeeeah.... Aside from the rather obvious complication of constant super-high-energy photon/particle bombardment and gravitational tidal stressing/heating, rather swiftly turning any such "planet" into a rarefied cloud of high-energy plasma (or rather, preventing any such planet from coalescing in the first place...)
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Apr 14, 2011
"You can actually get paid" - QC

Get Lost... Worthless MoneyGrubber
ZephirAWT
Apr 14, 2011
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
farmerpat42
4 / 5 (4) Apr 15, 2011
Wow...

You can actually get paid in the "scientific community" for making a completely pointless theory like this, but can't get paid for actually trying to solve real world problems that actually matter to people...


I'd guess that this theory was just a tangent to some other research he was doing. So he's not getting paid to talk about life in black holes, it was just something that came up during some more practical black hole investigation and he is using it to relate the principle of what a blackhole is on the inside.