Plasma nanoscience needed for green energy revolution

Apr 14, 2011

A step change in research relating to plasma nanoscience is needed for the world to overcome the challenge of sufficient energy creation and storage, says a leading scientist from CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the University of Sydney, Australia.

Professor Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov of the Centre Australia, CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, has highlighted, in IOP Publishing's Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, the unique potential of plasma nanoscience to control energy and matter at fundamental levels to produce cost-effective, environmentally and human health friendly for applications in virtually any area of human activity.

Professor Ostrikov is a pioneer in the field of plasma nanoscience, and was awarded the Australian Future Fellowship (2011) of the Australian Research Council, Walter Boas Medal of the Australian Institute of Physics (2010), Pawsey Medal of the Australian Academy of Sciences (2008), and CEO Science Leader Fellowship and Award of CSIRO (2008) on top of gaining seven other prestigious fellowships and eight honorary and visiting professorships in six different countries.

He said: "We can find the best, most suitable plasmas and processes for virtually any application-specific nanomaterials using plasma nanoscience knowledge.

"The terms 'best' and 'most-suitable' have many dimensions including quality, yield, cost, environment and human friendliness, and most recently, ."

Plasma nanoscience involves the use of plasma – an ionised gas at temperatures from just a few to tens of thousands Kelvin – as a tool to create and process very small (nano) materials for use in energy conversion, electronics, IT, health care, and numerous other applications that are critical for a sustainable future.

In particular, Ostrikov points out the ability of plasma to synthesise carbon nanotubes – one of the most exciting materials in modern physics, with extraordinary properties arising from their size, dimension, and structure, capable of revolutionising the way energy is produced, transferred and stored.

Until recently, the unpredictable nature of plasma caused some scientists to question its ability to control energy and matter in order to construct nanomaterials, however Ostrikov draws on existing research to provide evidence that it can be controlled down to fundamental levels leading to cost-effective and environmentally friendly processes.

Compared to existing methods of nanomaterials production, Ostrikov states that plasma can offer a simple, cheaper, faster, and more efficient way of moving "from controlled complexity to practical simplicity" and has encouraged researchers to grasp the opportunities that present themselves in this field.

Explore further: Physical constant is constant even in strong gravitational fields

More information: From 14th April this journal paper can be found at iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/44/17/174003 . This paper is part of the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue entitled "Perspectives in plasma nanoscience" and is available from 14th April at iopscience.iop.org/0022-3727/p… 20issue%20collection

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Australia takes on energy-guzzling TVs

Oct 10, 2007

A report for the Australian government recommends new energy efficiency standards for televisions that would ban most plasma models now available.

Big prize for 'small science' physicist

May 07, 2009

CSIRO scientist, Dr Amanda Barnard, has been awarded the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) 2009 Young Scientist Prize in Computational Physics.

Fusion technology: from ANU to the world

Jun 30, 2005

Technology pioneered at ANU that could see the future of power generation become clean and green has come a step closer today with the announcement of an international development to harness fusion technology. Australian sci ...

Wave power could contain fusion plasma

Jan 10, 2011

Researchers at the University of Warwick’s Centre for Fusion Space and Astrophysics and the UK Atomic Energy Authority’s Culham Centre for Fusion Energy may have found a way to channel the flux and fury of a nuclear ...

Recommended for you

How Paramecium protozoa claw their way to the top

16 hours ago

The ability to swim upwards – towards the sun and food supplies – is vital for many aquatic microorganisms. Exactly how they are able to differentiate between above and below in often murky waters is ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

holoman
not rated yet Jun 08, 2011
This technology can use solar / wind energy to power the hydrogen production for combustion engines, fuel cells and electric power plants.

PLASMA-BASED HYDROGEN GENERATION

In mid 2011, a plasma-based system is being developed which will generate Hydrogen from sea water using less energy than electrolysis.

The process has been named ECP-AMF.

The technology is scalable from micro to macro size, so could be sized to suit a Pilot Project.

It will not require a large energy input to trigger the
process.

The source seawater/brine/fresh water will not need to be
supplied to the process at an elevated temperature nor in a
vapor state unlike electrolysis.

It is the first technology that is 100% efficient and creates no pollution or toxic waste whatsoever.

One US university will be collaborating with API Inc. technology development.

The plasma physics analogy is like using a key to open an unbreakable molecular lock with little energy.